Attitude to Bridget McKenzie’s resignation and grant allocation

Mar 10, 2020

Q The Deputy Leader of the Nationals resigned last month for having a conflict of interest in awarding a grant to a shooting club of which she was a member. There are ongoing questions about the extent to which other ministers knew and participated in the allocation of regional sporting grants.

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Unsure
The investigation needs to continue to investigate any MP involved in the allocation of sports grants 71% 16% 42% 28% 10% 6% 13%
The minister’s resignation should be the end of the matter 43% 42% 19% 24% 21% 21% 14%

 

NET: Agree Mar’20 Feb’20 Difference
The investigation needs to continue to investigate any MP involved in the allocation of sports grants 71% 70% +1
The minister’s resignation should be the end of the matter 43% 49% -6
Base (n) 1,096 1,057
  • 71% of participants agree that the investigation needs to continue to investigate any MP involved in the allocation of sports grants, which is no different to the Feb’20 results.
  • On the other hand, now 43% of participants agree that the minister’s resignation should be the end of the matter (43%) down 6pts from Feb’20.

Government support for coal-fired power plants

Feb 25, 2020

Q. Which of the following statements regarding the future of coal is closest to your view?

  Total Federal Voting Intention (Lower House)
  Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
The government should be working to shut down mines and coal-fired power plants as soon as possible 32% 36% 21% 62% 27%
The government should let the coal mining industry and coal-fired power plants continue operating as long as they are profitable, but not subsidise them or support the expansion of the industry 47% 45% 52% 28% 50%
The government should subsidise coal-fired power plants to keep them going and provide financial support for new mines and other projects in the coal industry 21% 19% 27% 10% 22%
Base (n) 1,090 336 390 104 146
  • 47% of participants say that letting the coal mining industry and coal-fired power plants continue operating as long as they are profitable, but not subsidise them or support the expansion of the industry is closest to their view.
  • A third (32%) say working to shut down mines and coal-fired power plants as soon as possible is closest to their view, with Greens voters most likely to select that option (62%).
  • Coalition voters are most likely to say subsidising coal-fired power plants to keep them going and provide financial support for new mines and other projects in the coal industry, is closest to their view (27%).

Attitudes towards coal

Feb 25, 2020

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about coal?

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Unsure
Improvements in renewable energy will mean that burning coal to generate electricity will become less necessary 75% 14% 43% 32% 8% 6% 11%
Advances in technology and international action on climate change will mean coal becomes uneconomical to extract in the future 65% 18% 28% 36% 12% 6% 17%
If we’re serious about dealing with climate change, Australia needs to get out of coal as soon as possible 64% 24% 34% 29% 13% 11% 13%
Even if Australia stops exporting coal for electricity generation, it should still export coal for steel production 61% 19% 26% 36% 12% 7% 20%
Rather than digging it all up now, Australia should leave its coal resources in the ground to use when it becomes more valuable in the future 53% 29% 21% 33% 20% 8% 18%

 

NET: Agree   Age Federal Voting Intention (Lower House)
Total 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Improvements in renewable energy will mean that burning coal to generate electricity will become less necessary 75% 80% 76% 70% 82% 70% 83% 68%
Advances in technology and international action on climate change will mean coal becomes uneconomical to extract in the future 65% 74% 61% 61% 73% 60% 70% 53%
If we’re serious about dealing with climate change, Australia needs to get out of coal as soon as possible 64% 75% 65% 52% 72% 54% 87% 49%
Even if Australia stops exporting coal for electricity generation, it should still export coal for steel production 61% 61% 64% 59% 60% 72% 38% 59%
Rather than digging it all up now, Australia should leave its coal resources in the ground to use when it becomes more valuable in the future 53% 64% 53% 44% 57% 50% 56% 45%
Base (n) 1,090 341 374 375 336 390 104 146
  • Three-quarters of participants (75%) agree that improvements in renewable energy will mean that burning coal to generate electricity will become less necessary, 65% agree that advances in technology and international action on climate change will mean coal becomes uneconomical to extract in the future and 64% agree if we’re serious about dealing with climate change, Australia needs to get out of coal as soon as possible.
  • Participants aged 18-34, those with a university education and Greens or Labor voters are more likely to agree with these statements than those over 55, those with a secondary school education and Coalition or other voters (other minor party or independent candidate).
  • Coalition voters are most likely to agree that even if Australia stops exporting coal for electricity generation, it should still export coal for steel production (72%), compared to 38% of Greens voters.
  • Capital city residents are more likely to agree if we’re serious about dealing with climate change, Australia needs to get out of coal as soon as possible (67%) and rather than digging it all up now, Australia should leave its coal resources in the ground to use when it becomes more valuable in the future (56%); than non-capital city residents (56% and 47% respectively).

Support for zero-carbon pollution target for 2050

Feb 25, 2020

Q. To what extent would you support or oppose setting a zero-carbon pollution target for 2050 if it were adopted by the Federal Government?

    Federal Voting Intention (Lower House) Jan’20
Total Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Strongly support 31% 38% 22% 59% 19% 32%
Somewhat support 44% 42% 46% 33% 44% 39%
Somewhat oppose 15% 13% 17% 6% 17% 18%
Strongly oppose 11% 7% 15% 2% 20% 12%
NET: Support 75% 80% 68% 91% 63% 71%
NET: Oppose 25% 20% 32% 9% 37% 29%
Base (n) 1,090 336 390 104 146 1,080
  • 75% of participants support setting a zero-carbon pollution target for 2050 if it were adopted by the Federal Government, up from 71% in January.
  • The majority of all party voter support the introduction of targets. 91% of Greens voters, 80% of Labor and 68% of Coalition party voters all support the introduction of targets.
  • Women (79%), capital city residents (77%) and Greens voters (91%) are most likely to support this initiative.
  • Men (70%), non-capital city residents (70%) and independent/other party voters (63%) are least likely to support this initiative.

Type of volunteering engaged with

Feb 25, 2020

Q. Which, if any, of the following types of organisations do you currently volunteer for?

    Age Employment Status
Total 18-34 35-54 55+ In paid employment Not in paid employment Retired
Organisations providing support services, such as volunteer fire services, animal rescue and other charities 16% 25% 11% 12% 18% 10% 13%
Sports clubs or arts-based organisations 14% 22% 10% 10% 17% 10% 9%
Volunteer organisations linked with schools (e.g. reading support) 11% 16% 13% 5% 16% 6% 5%
Organisations promoting causes, such as environmental groups, political campaigns 10% 18% 9% 5% 14% 6% 6%
Church or faith-based organisations 9% 11% 9% 8% 10% 7% 9%
Community organisations, such as Scouts or historical societies 9% 14% 5% 7% 10% 6% 10%
None of these 59% 44% 64% 66% 53% 71% 62%
Base (n) 1,090 341 374 375 592 243 222
  • 41% of participants volunteer at one of the listed organisations – with organisations providing support services (16%) most frequently selected.
  • 18-34 year olds, university educated and participants working in paid employment are more likely to volunteer for any listed organisation.
  • Capital city residents and those with dependent children are more likely to volunteer at an organisation linked with schools (13% and 18% respectively) or promoting causes (12% and 14%) than non-capital city residents (both 7%) and those without dependent children (7% and 8%).
  • Greens voters are most likely to volunteer for an organisation providing support services (27%).

Support for Government initiatives for volunteers

Feb 25, 2020

Q. People have suggested a number of things the government could do to encourage people to volunteer more. How strongly do you support or oppose each of the following?

  NET: Support NET: Oppose Strongly support Somewhat support Neither support nor oppose Somewhat oppose Strongly oppose
Allow volunteers to claim travel and other expenses from volunteering as tax deductions 69% 10% 29% 40% 21% 6% 4%
The government reimburses volunteers directly for any out of pocket expenses from volunteering 60% 14% 25% 35% 25% 9% 5%
Give companies tax breaks when they allow their staff to take time off to do volunteer work 58% 11% 20% 38% 31% 7% 4%
  • 69% of participants support allowing volunteers to claim travel and other expenses from volunteering as tax deductions, 60% support the government directly reimbursing volunteers for any out of pocket expenses from volunteering and 58% support giving companies tax breaks when they allow their staff to take time off to do volunteer work.
  • Greens voters are most likely to support giving companies tax breaks when they allow their staff to take time off to do volunteer work (70%) whereas, independent/other party voters are least likely to support that suggestion (47%).

Actions taken since Coronavirus outbreak

Feb 25, 2020

Q. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, do any of the following statements apply to you?

    Age
Total 18-34 35-54 55+
I have stayed away from cities or town centres 20% 27% 22% 13%
I have avoided going to restaurants 20% 26% 23% 11%
I have stayed away from shopping centres 17% 23% 19% 9%
I have cancelled an overseas trip 15% 26% 16% 4%
None of these 70% 57% 66% 84%
Base (n) 1,090 341 374 375
  • 30% of participants have changed their behaviour in some way listed – with 20% saying they have either stayed away from cities or town centres, or avoided going to restaurants.
  • 18-34 year olds (43%), university educated (39%), capital city residents (34%) and those with dependent children (36%) are most likely to report changing their behaviour since the Coronavirus outbreak.
  • Whereas 55+ year olds (16%), those with a secondary school education (20%), non-capital residents (23%) and participants without dependent children (27%) are least likely to report behavioural changes.

Attitudes towards border protection and Coronavirus

Feb 25, 2020

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the Coronavirus?

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
Because of global movements in people we are more vulnerable to the spread of viruses like this 81% 5% 43% 38% 14% 3% 2%
The Australian government has been right to prevent people from mainland China entering Australia 80% 6% 53% 27% 14% 4% 3%
The government and the media have done a good job in keeping the public informed about the virus 62% 15% 22% 40% 23% 10% 5%
The border with China should be kept open to keep money from tourism and students coming into the country 20% 54% 6% 14% 26% 22% 32%

 

NET: Agree   Age Federal Voting Intention (Lower House)
Total 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Because of global movements in people we are more vulnerable to the spread of viruses like this 81% 70% 82% 90% 80% 86% 76% 84%
The Australian government has been right to prevent people from mainland China entering Australia 80% 71% 80% 88% 79% 88% 66% 82%
The government and the media have done a good job in keeping the public informed about the virus 62% 53% 59% 73% 61% 73% 49% 53%
The border with China should be kept open to keep money from tourism and students coming into the country 20% 28% 20% 13% 21% 21% 22% 13%
Base (n) 1,090 341 374 375 336 390 104 146
  • Four out of five participants agree that because of global movements in people we are more vulnerable to the spread of viruses like this (81%) or the Australian government has been right to prevent people from mainland China entering Australia (80%).
  • Three in five agree the government and the media have done a good job in keeping the public informed about the virus (62%); but only one in five agree that the border with China should be kept open to keep money from tourism and students coming into the country (20%).
  • Participants over 55 years old (90%, 88% and 73% agreement respectively) and Liberal voters (86%, 88% and 73%) are more likely to agree with the top three statements.
  • Capital residents are more likely to agree that government and the media have done a good job in keeping the public informed about the virus than those in non-capital cities (65% compared to 57%).
  • Men, 18-34 year olds and participants with a university education are more likely to agree that the border with China should be kept open to keep money from tourism and students coming into the country (24%, 28%, 29% respectively); than women, participants over 55 or with a secondary school education (16%, 13%, 12% respectively).
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