Trust in Institutions

Jun 12, 2012

Q. How much trust do you have in the following institutions and organisations?

 

Total

trust

26 Sep 11

Total

trust

12 Jun 12

A lot of trust

Some trust

A little trust

No trust

Don’t know

% change

The High Court

72%

60%

20%

40%

24%

9%

7%

-12

The ABC

46%

54%

15%

39%

31%

10%

6%

+8

Charitable organisations

61%

50%

8%

42%

35%

10%

5%

-9

The Reserve Bank

67%

49%

13%

36%

30%

14%

7%

-18

Environment groups

45%

32%

6%

26%

35%

25%

7%

-13

The Commonwealth Public Service

  49%*

30%

4%

26%

42%

18%

9%

-19

Religious organisations

29%

27%

5%

22%

30%

37%

6%

-2

Newspapers

na

26%

3%

23%

46%

23%

5%

na

Online news media

na

23%

2%

21%

45%

25%

6%

na

Federal Parliament

55%

22%

3%

19%

37%

36%

6%

-33

Trade unions

39%

22%

3%

19%

32%

37%

9%

-17

Business groups

38%

22%

2%

20%

46%

24%

8%

-16

TV news media

na

21%

3%

18%

43%

30%

5%

na

Political parties

na

12%

2%

10%

31%

52%

5%

na

Note: ‘Total Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by adding ‘A lot of trust’ and ‘Some trust’.

* This Commonwealth Public Service figure is from a question asked in 6 Feb 12.

 

Respondents had most trust in the High Court (60%), the ABC (54%), charitable organisations (50%) and the Reserve bank (49%). They had least trust in political parties (12%), TV news media (21%) Federal Parliament, trade unions and business groups (all 22%).

Trust in all institutions (except the ABC) declined since this question was asked last year. The major changes were a collapse in trust in Federal Parliament (-33%) and substantial declines in trust in the Commonwealth Public Service (-19%), the Reserve Bank (-18%), trade unions (-17%) and business groups (-16%).

Compared to the average, Labor voters had more trust in political parties (19%), Federal Parliament (34%), the High Court (67%),  the Reserve Bank (57%), the Commonwealth Public Service (42%), trade unions (36%) and  environment groups (43%).

Liberal/National voters, compared to the average, had more trust in religious organisations (33%) and business groups (27%) but less trust in Federal parliament (17%), the ABC (46%), trade unions (14%) and environment groups (21%).

Trust in Media

Dec 12, 2011

Q. How much trust do you have in what you read or hear in the following media?

Total a lot/some

15 Mar 10

Total a lot /some

25 Jul 11

Total a lot /some A lot of trust Some trust Not much trust No trust at all Don’t know Don’t use
News and opinion in daily newspapers 62% 53% 46% 3% 43% 32% 13% 3% 5%
News and opinion in local newspapers 54% 52% 4% 48% 29% 11% 3% 5%
Commercial TV news and current affairs 64% 48% 43% 5% 38% 34% 19% 3% 2%
ABC TV news and current affairs 70% 71% 72% 23% 49% 14% 6% 3% 5%
Commercial radio news and current affairs 54% 46% 45% 4% 41% 30% 15% 3% 6%
ABC radio news and current affairs 62% 67% 67% 19% 48% 14% 6% 3% 10%
Commercial radio talkback programs 38% 33% 33% 5% 28% 32% 22% 3% 10%
ABC radio talkback programs 45% 47% 47% 7% 40% 28% 9% 3% 13%
News and opinion websites 49% 41% 38% 3% 35% 36% 14% 4% 9%
Internet blogs 20% 20% 17% 1% 16% 37% 25% 5% 15%

Since July, trust in media has dropped for daily newspapers (-7%) and commercial TV news and current affairs (-5%).

ABC TV news and current affairs has the highest number of people who have a lot/some trust (72%). This is followed by ABC radio news and current affairs (67%).

The lowest level of trust was recorded for internet blog (17%). This was followed by commercial radio talkback programs (33%).

Comments »

Regulation of Newspapers

Dec 12, 2011

Q. Newspapers and magazines are regulated by the Australian Press Council which was established by the media industry and comprises representatives of media organisations and as well as independent members.

From what you read, do you think that the Press Council is doing a good or poor job of regulating newspapers in Australia?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Total good 20% 22% 25% 14%
Total poor 25% 26% 22% 37%
Very good job 1% 3% 1%
Good job 19% 19% 24% 14%
Neither good nor poor 38% 38% 40% 31%
Poor job 17% 15% 16% 24%
Very poor job 8% 11% 6% 13%
Don’t know 17% 14% 13% 18%

20% believed that the Press Council is doing a good job of regulating newspapers and 25% thought it is doing a poor job. 38% say they are doing neither a good nor poor job and 17% don’t know.

Those most likely to think they are doing a good job were aged under 35 (25%) and Liberal/National voters (25%). Those most likely to think they are doing a poor job were aged 55+ (35%) and Greens voters (37%).

Comments »

Media Usage

Nov 7, 2011

Q. Thinking about where you get your news, on an average day which of the following media would you use? (multiple response)

Q. And which one is your main source of news?

Total used Main source Total use (weekdays) Dec 10
Daily newspaper 41% 13% 42%
Commercial (free-to-air) TV news 60% 31% 64%
ABC TV news 32% 8% 32%
SBS TV news 15% 2% 12%
Pay TV news 11% 3% 10%
Commercial radio news 28% 5% 27%
ABC radio news 18% 5% 17%
Internet news sites – e.g. newspaper sites, ABC, etc 59% 30% 55%
Internet blogs 8% * 6%
None of them 2% 2% 5%

The most used media for daily news were commercial TV news (60% use daily), internet news sites (59%) and daily newspapers (41%).

Since this question was last asked in December last year, usage of internet news sites has increased a little (+4%) and commercial TV news decreased a little (-4%).

The main sources of news were commercial TV news (31%) and internet news sites (30%).

Commercial TV news was the main source of news for 38% of those aged 45-64, 36% of women and 44% of part-time workers.

Internet news sites were the main source of news for 43% of those aged under 35 and 36% of full-time workers.

Daily newspapers were the main source of news for 26% of those aged 65+.

Comments »

Pay to Access News Websites

Nov 7, 2011

Q. Some newspapers in Australia now require readers to take out a subscription to view all their articles online. This means, while some news and opinion articles are free, readers will have to pay to access all content. How likely would you be to pay a subscription to access news websites?

Total Aged

18-34

Aged

35-54

Aged 55+ Main source Internet news sites
Total likely 9% 14% 6% 4% 8%
Total not likely 88% 80% 89% 95% 88%
Very likely 2% 2% 1% 2% 1%
Somewhat likely 7% 12% 5% 2% 7%
Not very likely 18% 18% 17% 19% 19%
Not at all likely 70% 62% 72% 76% 69%
Don’t know 4% 5% 5% 1% 5%

Only 9% of respondents said they would be very or somewhat likely to pay to access news websites.

Among those for whom news websites are their main source of news, only 8% said they would be likely to pay for access. Younger respondents were more likely to be willing to pay for access to news websites – 14% of those aged under 35.

Comments »

News Sources – Weekdays

Dec 13, 2010

Q. Thinking about where you get your news, on an average weekday which of the following media would you use?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Daily newspaper 42% 42% 47% 38%
Commercial (free-to-air) TV news 64% 68% 67% 57%
ABC TV news 32% 34% 34% 32%
SBS TV news 12% 10% 11% 19%
Pay TV news 10% 11% 11% 6%
Commercial radio news 27% 23% 34% 20%
ABC radio news 17% 17% 17% 22%
Internet news sites – e.g. newspaper sites, ABC, etc 55% 54% 59% 56%
Internet blogs 6% 4% 7% 10%
None of them 5% 2% 3% 10%

The most commonly used news sources on weekdays are commercial TV news (64%), internet news sites (55%) and newspapers (42%).

Respondents aged 45+ were more likely to use commercial TV news (70%), newspapers (48%), and ABC TV news (43%). Those aged under 35 were more likely to access internet news sites (60%) and less likely to read newspapers (36%). Comments »

News Sources – Weekends

Dec 13, 2010

Q. And where do you get your news on an average weekend?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Weekend newspaper 50% 51% 56% 43%
Commercial (free-to-air) TV news 59% 64% 62% 42%
ABC TV news 28% 29% 30% 29%
SBS TV news 10% 9% 10% 13%
Pay TV news 9% 9% 10% 3%
Commercial radio news 17% 15% 22% 10%
ABC radio news 13% 13% 14% 17%
Internet news sites – e.g. newspaper sites, ABC, etc 42% 41% 43% 42%
Internet blogs 4% 2% 4% 8%
None of them 6% 4% 3% 15%

 The most commonly used news sources on weekends are commercial TV news (59%), newspapers (50%) and internet news sites (42%). Respondents were more likely to read newspapers on weekends than weekdays (42% weekdays/50% weekends) but less likely to view commercial TV news (64%/59%) or internet news sites (55%/42%).

Respondents aged 55+ were more likely to use commercial TV news (65%), newspapers (61%), and ABC TV news (46%). Comments »

Trust in News Sources

Dec 13, 2010

Q. Please rate your level of trust in the news and information from each source.

 

Total always/usually trustworthy

Always trustworthy

Usually trustworthy

Seldom trustworthy

I do not trust it at all

Don’t know

ABC TV news 82% 21% 61% 7% 3% 8%
SBS TV news 78% 19% 59% 8% 2% 12%
ABC radio news 78% 18% 60% 8% 3% 12%
Commercial (free-to-air) TV news 69% 5% 64% 20% 6% 5%
Internet news sites – e.g. newspaper sites, ABC, etc 66% 5% 61% 18% 4% 12%
Newspapers 65% 3% 62% 22% 7% 6%
Commercial radio news 62% 4% 58% 19% 8% 11%
Pay TV news 48% 4% 44% 14% 6% 32%
Internet blogs 17% 1% 16% 31% 26% 26%

 The most trusted news sources were ABC TV news (82%), ABC radio news (78%) and SBS TV news (78%).

The least trustworthy were internet blogs (57% seldom/no trust), newspapers (29%), commercial radio news (27%) and commercial TV news (26%).

Women were more likely than men to trust commercial TV news (75%/62%), newspapers (68%/63%) and commercial radio news (68%/55%). Comments »

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