Essential Report

Satisfaction with speed of Covid-19 vaccine rollout

Apr 26, 2021

Q. Which of the following best describes your view on how quickly Australians are being vaccinated against Covid-19?

They are being vaccinated…

  This week

26/04

Two weeks ago 12/04
… much more quickly than I would like 11% 13%
… a bit more quickly than I would like 9% 8%
… at about the right speed 21% 19%
… a bit more slowly than I would like 26% 25%
… a lot more slowly than I would like 19% 27%
Unsure 14% 9%
TOTAL:  More quickly than I would like 19% 20%
TOTAL:  More slowly than I would like 45% 52%
Base (n) 1,090 1,368

 

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
… much more quickly than I would like 11% 13% 9% 16% 13% 4% 9% 11% 9% 19%
… a bit more quickly than I would like 9% 10% 7% 13% 11% 3% 10% 10% 8% 5%
… at about the right speed 21% 23% 20% 26% 19% 19% 17% 27% 18% 18%
… a bit more slowly than I would like 26% 25% 27% 23% 19% 36% 30% 29% 24% 17%
… a lot more slowly than I would like 19% 20% 19% 9% 18% 30% 24% 17% 20% 23%
Unsure 14% 9% 19% 14% 20% 8% 10% 6% 20% 18%
TOTAL:  More quickly than I would like 19% 23% 16% 29% 24% 7% 19% 21% 17% 25%
TOTAL:  More slowly than I would like 45% 45% 45% 32% 36% 66% 54% 45% 45% 39%
Base (n) 1,090 539 551 359 289 442 362 414 95 114
  • 45% now think Australians are being vaccinated against Covid-19 more slowly than they would like, a drop from two weeks ago (52%), as more participants are unsure about the speed of the vaccination rollout (14% this week, 9% two weeks ago).
  • The proportion of participants who think Australians are being vaccinated more quickly than they would like is on par with last fortnight (19% this week, 20% two weeks ago).
  • Those over 55 are still more likely than younger cohorts to think the vaccine rollout is progressing more slowly than they would like (66% compared to 36% of 35-54 and 32% those 18-34 years old).
  • Labor voters are also still the most likely voters to think the vaccine rollout is progressing more slowly than they would like (54% compared to 45% Coalition voters, 45% Greens voters and 39% independent and minor party voters).

Party most responsible for slow vaccine rollout

Apr 26, 2021

Q. Which do you think is MOST responsible for Australians being vaccinated more slowly than you would like?

[Asked only to those who think Australians are being vaccinated against Covid-19 a bit / a lot more slowly than they would like]

  This week

26/04

Two weeks ago 12/04
The federal government 48% 42%
State and territory governments 8% 7%
International supply chains 18% 24%
Unavoidable delays in the production of vaccines 16% 18%
Unsure 11% 8%
Base (n) 505 713

 

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
The federal government 48% 54% 41% 43% 54% 46% 59% 32% 64% 47%
State and territory governments 8% 9% 7% 12% 10% 6% 5% 12% 6% 7%
International supply chains 18% 17% 18% 13% 12% 22% 11% 28% 5% 14%
Unavoidable delays in the production of vaccines 16% 14% 17% 23% 11% 15% 14% 21% 13% 12%
Unsure 11% 6% 16% 9% 13% 10% 10% 7% 12% 20%
Base (n) 505 262 243 112 102 291 200 196 40 44
  • Almost half of those who say Australians are being vaccinated more slowly than they would like think the federal government is most responsible for this (48% up from 42% two weeks ago).
  • 18% place the onus on international supply chains (a drop from 24% two weeks ago), followed by 16% (on par with 18% a fortnight ago) who feel unavoidable delays in the production of vaccines are the main reason for the slow progress of the vaccine rollout in Australia.
  • Only 8% think state and territory governments are most responsible and 11% are unsure.
  • Those most likely to place responsibility on the federal government for Australians being vaccinated more slowly than they would like include men (54%), Greens (64%) and Labor voters (59%).
  • Coalition voters are the most likely to think international supply chains are most responsible for the delays (28%, compared to 10% of all other voters).

Time to return to normal

Apr 26, 2021

Q. Thinking about the future, how long do you think it will take for the following to occur?

APRIL 2021 Within the next six months Seven months up to one year One to two years More than two years Never
The Covid-19 vaccine rollout will be completed in Australia 7% 23% 42% 21% 7%
Quarantine will no longer be required after international travel 8% 15% 37% 31% 9%
The housing market will return pre-pandemic levels 16% 17% 30% 22% 15%
International travel will be allowed without restriction 7% 14% 32% 40% 8%
Unemployment will return to pre-pandemic levels 10% 20% 34% 27% 9%
Australia will pay off its national debt 5% 8% 11% 42% 34%

 

JULY 2020 Within the next six months Seven months up to one year One to two years More than two years Never
A Covid-19 vaccine will be developed 9% 21% 43% 20% 6%
Quarantine will no longer required after international travel 7% 17% 38% 32% 6%
The housing market will return pre-pandemic levels 7% 15% 35% 38% 5%
International travel will be allowed without restriction 6% 14% 36% 38% 6%
Unemployment will return to pre-pandemic levels 6% 13% 27% 48% 6%
Australia will pay off its national debt 5% 6% 14% 53% 23%
  • Current expectations of when the Covid-19 vaccine rollout will be completed in Australia mirrors expectations in July 2020 of when a Covid-19 vaccine will be developed. The largest cohort (42%) think the rollout will be completed in one to two years, reflecting the 43% last July who thought a Covid-19 vaccine would be developed in one to two years.
  • People are now more optimistic that the housing market will return to pre-pandemic levels, with 16% who currently think this will happen within the next six months, compared to the 7% who thought this last July.
  • People are also now more hopeful that unemployment will return to pre-pandemic levels, with 20% now thinking this could happen in seven months up to one year (20%) or one to two years (34%).
  • However, over a third (34%) now think Australia will never pay off its national debt, with the majority (42%) thinking this will take more than two years.
  • Current expectations of when quarantine will no longer be required after international travel and when international travel will be allowed without restriction also align with expectations last July, with most people thinking this will take one to two years or more than two years.

Uptake of a Covid-19 vaccine

Mar 16, 2021

Q. The Covid-19 vaccine rollout has begun in Australia.

Once a vaccine becomes available to you, how long would you wait before taking it?

  15/03 01/03 18/01 14/12 10/08
I’d get vaccinated as soon as possible / I’ve already been vaccinated 47% 50% 42% 43% 56%
I’d get vaccinated, but wouldn’t do it straight away 40% 40% 47% 46% 35%
I’d never get vaccinated 12% 10% 11% 10% 8%
Base (n) 1,124 1,074 1,084 1,071 1,010
  • With the launch of the Covid-19 vaccine rollout underway nationwide, just under half (47%) now say they would get vaccinated as soon as possible – a slight dip from earlier in March but still noticeably higher than levels at the end of 2020 and at the start of this year.
  • The same proportion of people as earlier in the month say that would get vaccinated but not straight away (40%).
  • Just over 1 in 10 (12%) say that would never get vaccinated, consistent with levels seen in the last few months.
  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
I’d get vaccinated as soon as possible / I’ve already been vaccinated 47% 51% 42% 33% 44% 60% 46% 55% 45% 42%
I’d get vaccinated, but wouldn’t do it straight away 40% 36% 43% 50% 38% 32% 42% 35% 42% 33%
I’d never get vaccinated 12% 9% 15% 16% 13% 7% 11% 8% 12% 20%
Base (n) 1,124 553 571 337 383 404 375 410 98 142
  • Those most likely to get the vaccine immediately include men (51%) and those aged over 55 (60%).
  • Those voting for independent or minor parties are the most likely to say they would never get vaccinated (20%).

Uptake of a Covid-19 vaccine

Jan 19, 2021

Q. Once a vaccine for Covid-19 becomes available in Australia, how long would you wait before taking it?

  18/01 14/12 10/08
I’d get vaccinated as soon as possible 42% 43% 56%
I’d get vaccinated, but wouldn’t do it straight away 47% 46% 35%
I’d never get vaccinated 11% 10% 8%
Base (n) 1,084 1,071 1,010

 

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
I’d get vaccinated as soon as possible 42% 51% 34% 30% 42% 54% 48% 49% 34% 33%
I’d get vaccinated, but wouldn’t do it straight away 47% 38% 55% 57% 46% 39% 44% 44% 57% 42%
I’d never get vaccinated 11% 11% 11% 14% 13% 7% 8% 7% 9% 25%
Base (n) 1,084 539 545 341 358 385 334 431 118 106
  • Fewer people say they would get a Covid-19 vaccine immediately than mid last year. 42% would get a vaccine as soon as possible, down from 56% last August. 47% would get vaccinated, but just not straight away (up from 35% in August) and 11% say they would never get vaccinated.
  • Those most likely to get the vaccine immediately include men (51%) and those aged over 55 (54%).
  • Those voting for independent or minor parties are the most likely to say they would never get vaccinated (25%).

Coronavirus concerns

Dec 1, 2020

Q. To what extent are you concerned about the threat of Covid-19 (coronavirus) in Australia?

  30/11 16/11 02/11 05/10 21/09 07/09 24/08 10/08 27/07 13/07 22/06
Very concerned 27% 27% 30% 30% 36% 37% 40% 50% 43% 36% 25%
Quite concerned 43% 44% 46% 52% 45% 45% 46% 40% 44% 48% 50%
Not that concerned 24% 23% 20% 15% 15% 13% 10% 7% 9% 12% 21%
Not at all concerned 6% 6% 4% 3% 4% 5% 4% 3% 4% 3% 4%
Base (n) 1,034 1,010 1,063 1,066 1,081 1,076 1,068 1,010 1,058 1,054 1,079
  • Concern about the threat of Covid-19 is at a similar level as last fortnight, with 30% saying they are either not that concerned (24%) or not at all concerned (6%). 27% are very concerned about the threat and the remaining 43% are quite concerned.

Attitudes towards nationalism and Covid-19

Dec 1, 2020

Q. Thinking now about how the Covid-19 pandemic has affected the world, which of the following statements is closest to your views?

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
The pandemic has shown that the world is interconnected. The best way to respond to global threats in the future is to cooperate and provide assistance to other countries 48% 50% 45% 51% 48% 44% 48% 46% 60% 38%
The pandemic has shown that in times of crisis, it is every country for itself. Australia needs to be economically strong and maintain strict border protections to deal with global threats in the future 52% 50% 55% 49% 52% 56% 52% 54% 40% 62%
Base (n) 1,034 528 506 329 320 385 322 430 88 107
  • Australians are split on their views towards the lessons from Covid-19. 52% think the pandemic has shown that in times of crisis, it is every country for itself, whereas 48% think the pandemic has shown that the world is inter-connected, and countries need to cooperate to respond to global threats.

Coronavirus concerns

Nov 17, 2020

Q. To what extent are you concerned about the threat of Covid-19 (coronavirus) in Australia?

  16/11/20 02/11/20 05/10 21/09 07/09 24/08 10/08 27/07 13/07 22/06 15/06
Very concerned 27% 30% 30% 36% 37% 40% 50% 43% 36% 25% 28%
Quite concerned 44% 46% 52% 45% 45% 46% 40% 44% 48% 50% 45%
Not that concerned 23% 20% 15% 15% 13% 10% 7% 9% 12% 21% 23%
Not at all concerned 6% 4% 3% 4% 5% 4% 3% 4% 3% 4% 4%
Base (n) 1,010 1,063 1,066 1,081 1,076 1,068 1,010 1,058 1,054 1,079 1,087
  • Concern about the threat of Covid-19 is easing, with 29% saying they are either not that concerned (23%) or not at all concerned (6%). 27% are very concerned about the threat and the remaining 44% are quite concerned.
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