Can a price on carbon create jobs?

Jul 3, 2012



Tim Ayres tells manufacturers to focus on opportunities in clean energy and new government subsidies.

Despite the hyperbole on one side and scaremongering on the other, the much debated carbon tax is in place. For manufacturers, the carbon tax is a game shifter heralding new beginnings but also some losses.

Tim Ayres for the AMWU tells 3Q about the opportunities and challenges to Australia’s clean, green future. Though the Government has committed billions in loans through the Clean Energy Finance Corporation kick-starting a clean technology industry in wind, solar and geothermal will mean putting the right policies in place so that local workers benefit.

Do we need foreign workers?

Jun 26, 2012


Rita Mallia speaks of the importance of unemployed locals getting the first pick of mining jobs as well as her union’s proud multicultural ethos.

Importing foreign workers has rocketed during the mining boom. Last year almost 90,000 workers were employed under 457 visa grants allowing them to stay and work in Australia for up to four years. The number of visas granted is up nearly 50 per cent on last year.

Since Gina RInehart received permission to bring in 1700 workers for her Roy Hill mine and the subsequent uproar, a Resources Jobs Board has been created.

The CFMEU’s Rita Mallia tells 3Q 60,000 people have already visited the website — putting paid to claims that Australians don’t want to do remote mining work.

Job security

Mar 26, 2012

Q. How concerned are you that you or some member of your immediate family will lose their job in the next year or so: very concerned, somewhat concerned, or not at all concerned? 

 

8 Jun

09

5 Oct

09

28 Jun 10

18 Oct 10

4 Apr

11

4 Jul

11

3 Oct

11

26 Mar 12

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total concerned

52%

49%

43%

40%

43%

45%

47%

49%

43%

55%

34%

Very concerned

13%

14%

9%

11%

11%

13%

14%

13%

9%

16%

8%

Somewhat concerned

39%

35%

34%

29%

32%

32%

33%

36%

34%

39%

26%

Not at all concerned

35%

40%

38%

42%

43%

39%

37%

36%

44%

31%

51%

Don’t know

6%

6%

12%

10%

8%

8%

7%

8%

6%

7%

9%

No employees in the immediate family

8%

5%

7%

7%

7%

7%

7%

7%

7%

6%

6%

Concern over job security has risen slightly since the last time the question was polled, increasing 2 points up from 47% in October 2011 to 49% (total concerned).

In the 12 months from April 2011, total concern has increased from 43% to 49%.

Coalition voters are the most likely to be concerned that they or a member of their immediately family will lose their job in the next year or so (55% total concerned), whereas Greens voters are less likely to be concerned (34% total concerned).

There were no major differences across income or age groups – except for the under 25’s where 41% were concerned and 48% not at all concerned.

Comments »

Taking Sick Days

Mar 26, 2012

Q. Which of the following apply to you over the last 12 months?

 

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

I have taken a sickie (that is, a day off work when you weren’t really sick)

23%

23%

22%

30%

21%

8%

 I have taken a day off sick without a doctor’s certificate

51%

49%

52%

55%

53%

34%

I have taken a day off sick with a doctor’s certificate

47%

49%

44%

49%

49%

33%

I have gone to work when I was sick

81%

83%

78%

83%

82%

70%

* based of those who worked in paid employment over the last 12 months

More than three times as many respondents said that, over the last 12 months, they had worked when they were sick than had taken a “sickie”. 81% said they had gone to work when they were sick and 23% said they had taken a day off work when they weren’t really sick.

Men (83%) were a little more likely than women (78%) to go to work when they were sick.

Those aged under 35 were a little more likely to take a “sickie” (30%) but were also more likely to go to work when they were sick (83%).

Older respondents seem to be less likely to get sick at all – 70% said they had worked when sick – and only 34% had taken a day off with a doctor’s certificate and 33% without a doctor’s certificate.

Comments »

Importance of Industries for Providing Jobs

Feb 20, 2012

Q. How important are the following industries for providing jobs for Australians into the future?

Very important Quite important Somewhat important Not very important Don’t know
Mining 64% 24% 7% 2% 3%
Construction 58% 30% 9% 0% 2%
Manufacturing 55% 29% 12% 2% 2%
Tourism 53% 33% 11% 1% 2%
Retail 47% 35% 13% 2% 2%
Hospitality 46% 38% 12% 1% 3%
Finance 39% 38% 18% 3% 3%
Telecommunications 39% 37% 18% 3% 3%

Respondents regard the mining (64%), construction (58%) and manufacturing (55%) industries to be the most important for providing jobs for Australians in the future.

This was followed closely by the tourism (53%), retail (47%) and hospitality (46%) industries.

The finance (39%) and telecommunications (39%) industries are the most likely to be seen as only ‘somewhat important’ (18%) for providing jobs.

Comments »

Most Important Roles of Government

Jan 23, 2012

Q. From the following list, what do you think are the three most important roles of the Federal Government? (Number from 1 to 3 where 1 is the most important, 2 the second most important, etc)

Most important Second Third Total
Delivering basic services like health and education 18% 27% 20% 65%
Managing the economy in uncertain economic times 20% 15% 14% 49%
Making the big decisions for the nations future 20% 12% 12% 44%
Ensuring that all Australians benefit from Australia’s wealth 13% 10% 11% 34%
Supporting Australian industries to provide jobs 8% 12% 12% 32%
Reducing government spending so money can be returned back to taxpayers 9% 8% 8% 25%
Investing in infrastructure including road rail and broadband 3% 7% 10% 20%
Providing support to the most disadvantaged 4% 4% 8% 16%
Don’t know 5% 5% 5% 5%

Respondents considered that the most important roles of the Federal Government were delivering basic services like health and hospitals (65%), managing the economy in uncertain economic times (49%) and making the big decisions for the nations future (44%).

The least important roles were providing support for the most disadvantaged (16%), investing in infrastructure including road rail and broadband (20%) and reducing government spending so money can be returned to taxpayers (25%).

Comments »

Party best to handle Issues

Jan 23, 2012

Q. Which party do you think is best to handle each of the following issues?

Labor Liberal Greens Don’t know
Making the big decisions for the nations future 28% 41% 5% 26%
Managing the economy in uncertain economic times 30% 44% 2% 24%
Delivering basic services like health and education 34% 36% 5% 25%
Investing in infrastructure including road rail and broadband 34% 36% 2% 28%
Supporting Australian industries to provide jobs 33% 39% 3% 25%
Reducing government spending so money can be returned back to taxpayers 21% 46% 3% 29%
Ensuring that all Australians benefit from Australia’s wealth 31% 34% 6% 29%
Providing support to the most disadvantaged 34% 27% 9% 29%

The Liberal Party was considered substantially better than Labor at making the big decisions for the nations future (41% to 28%), managing the economy in uncertain economic times (44%/30% ) and reducing Government spending so money can be retuned back to taxpayers (46%/21%).

They were also considered a little better at supporting Australian industries to provide jobs (39%/33%). The Labor Party was considered a little better at providing support to the most disadvantaged (34%/27%) and the two parties scored similarly on delivering basic services like health and education, investing in infrastructure including road rail and broadband and ensuring that all Australians benefit from Australia’s wealth.

Comments »

Jobs reform

Oct 3, 2011

Q. To what extent do you agree that the following measures will improve job creation and investment in Australia?

Total Agree Total Disagree Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
Increasing the number of apprenticeships 88% 4% 38% 50% 4% 0% 7%
Giving incentives to companies that invest in research and development 79% 8% 26% 53% 7% 1% 12%
Boosting investment in renewable energy technologies 75% 11% 30% 45% 8% 3% 14%
Requiring companies to use Australian made steel in large infrastructure projects 73% 11% 27% 46% 9% 2% 15%
Implementing industrial relations changes that give more flexibility to business 57% 19% 13% 44% 14% 5% 24%
Bringing back tariffs on products imported from overseas 52% 29% 16% 36% 20% 9% 19%
Introducing industrial relations reforms to make it easier to hire and fire people 41% 41% 13% 28% 29% 12% 18%

Increasing the number of apprenticeships (88% total agree) is the most popular measure for improving job creation and investment in Australia, followed by giving incentives to companies that invest in research and development (79% total agree) and boosting investment in renewable energy technologies (75%).

Requiring companies to use Australian made steel in large infrastructure projects is also strongly endorsed by respondents (73% total agree).

The least popular measure is introducing industrial relations reforms to make it easier to hire and fire people (41% total disagree).   Asked with a different emphasis, there is significantly less opposition to the suggestion of implementing industrial relations changes that give more flexibility to business (19% total disagree).

Comments »

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