Essential Report

View of Australia’s manufacturing industry

Oct 26, 2021

Q. Thinking about the Australian manufacturing industry, which of the following statements is closest to your view?

  Oct’21 Oct’13 Jun’13 Aug’12
 
With government support, Australia can have a successful manufacturing industry 69% 65% 61% 63%
There is no future for manufacturing in Australia and government support would be a waste of money 15% 19% 22% 17%
Unsure 16% 16% 17% 21%
  • 69% of people think with government support, Australia can have a successful manufacturing industry. 15% think there is no future for manufacturing in Australia and government support would be a waste of money. 16% are unsure.
  • Results in 2021 are similar to 2013 and 2012 levels.
  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
With government support, Australia can have a successful manufacturing industry 69% 69% 68% 57% 64% 83% 69% 73% 61% 70%
There is no future for manufacturing in Australia and government support would be a waste of money 15% 19% 12% 22% 16% 8% 16% 16% 18% 17%
Unsure 16% 12% 20% 20% 21% 9% 15% 11% 21% 13%
Column n 1,781 875 906 533 601 647 636 610 157 220
  • Those aged over 55 (83%) are most likely to think Australia can have a successful manufacturing industry with government support.
  • Among voters, Coalition voters (73%) are most likely to have this view, with minor/independent party voters (70%) and Labor voters following closely behind (69%).
  • Men (19%) and those aged 18-34 (22%) are most likely to think there is no future for manufacturing in Australia and government support would be a waste of money.

Importance of industries

Feb 18, 2014

Q. How important are the following industries for providing jobs for Australians into the future?

 

Very important

Quite important

Somewhat important

Not very important

Don’t know

 

Very important Feb 2012

Construction

58%

30%

9%

1%

3%

58%

Agriculture

57%

27%

12%

2%

3%

Manufacturing

55%

26%

12%

4%

3%

55%

Tourism

53%

31%

11%

3%

2%

53%

Mining

52%

29%

13%

4%

2%

64%

Retail

46%

35%

14%

2%

2%

47%

Hospitality

45%

37%

14%

2%

2%

46%

Finance

40%

34%

19%

3%

4%

39%

Telecommunications

37%

37%

19%

4%

3%

39%

Respondents regard the construction (58%), agriculture (57%) and manufacturing (55%) industries to be the most important for providing jobs for Australians in the future. These were followed closely by the tourism (53%) and mining (52%) industries.

Since this question was last asked in February 2012, those think mining is very important for future jobs has dropped from 64% to 52%.

Support for Toyota

Dec 17, 2013

Q. When Holden closes, Toyota will be the only company manufacturing cars in Australia. Do you think the Government should increase financial support for Toyota, decrease support or leave it the same?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Increase support

31%

 

44%

21%

16%

37%

Decrease support

11%

 

7%

15%

13%

8%

Leave it the same

44%

 

32%

52%

54%

49%

Don’t know

14%

17%

11%

17%

7%

31% think the Government should increase financial support to Toyota and 44% think they should leave it the same. Only 11% were in favour of decreasing the support for Toyota.

Support for industry package

Feb 25, 2013

Q. The Federal Government has announced a $1 billion package to support Australian jobs in blue-collar industries like manufacturing. Do you support this plan? 

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Support

48%

69%

39%

45%

Oppose

10%

1%

17%

10%

Haven’t heard of it

34%

24%

34%

40%

Don’t know

9%

6%

10%

5%

48% support the Government’s $1 billion package to support Australian jobs in blue-collar industries like manufacturing and 10% oppose. 34% said they hadn’t heard of it.

Strongest support was shown by Labor voters (69%), aged 35-44 (57%) and those earning $1,000-$1,600pw (56%).

Trust in industries

Jan 21, 2013

Q. How much trust do you have in the following industries to act in the public interest

 

Total a lot/some trust

A lot of trust

Some trust

Not much trust

No trust at all

Don’t know

Agriculture

72%

20%

52%

18%

4%

5%

Tourism

68%

12%

56%

22%

6%

5%

Manufacturing

56%

8%

48%

30%

8%

7%

Construction and development

48%

5%

43%

33%

12%

6%

Retail

47%

3%

44%

38%

12%

3%

Telecommunications

37%

3%

34%

41%

18%

3%

Banking

33%

5%

28%

36%

29%

3%

Mining

32%

3%

29%

35%

25%

8%

Media

30%

2%

28%

40%

27%

2%

Power companies

18%

1%

17%

37%

41%

4%

The industries most trusted to act in the public interest were agriculture (72% some/a lot of trust), tourism (68%) and manufacturing (56%).

The industries least trusted to act in the public interest were power companies (18%), the media (30%), mining (32%) and banking (33%).

The only industry on which there were major differences was mining where 43% of Liberal/National voters had a lot/some trust compared to only 25% of Labor voters and 17% of Greens voters.

We Still Make Stuff

Aug 14, 2012

If you read the press, you’d think there isn’t a single manufacturing job in any place but China. Truth is, though, lots of stuff is made right in your backyard—it just takes a bit of paying attention. Tim Ayres helps us put on the glasses.

Ayres, the New South Wales secretary of the Australian Manufacturing Workers Union, runs it down in a cogent piece in the Daily Telegraph:

As trains and motorways are funneling commuters east, work is already under way at the thousands of small and medium-sized factories and workshops often hidden from view.

Near Liverpool, workers at HPM make the only Australian-made powerboards, sockets, smoke alarms and switches you’ll find at your local hardware store.

At Minto, workers churn out Streets paddle pops and Cornettos. At Bella Vista, workers at ResMed make devices to treat sleep apnea.

To be sure, jobs are being hit. But, I think Ayres’ spectacular point is that there has to be a strategy to develop manufacturing without taking it out of the pockets of workers:

We won’t get there on labour costs: we’re lucky to live in a country where people earn fair wages. It will be through investment in technology, innovation and skills; a commitment from industry to employ managers who are capable of leading their enterprises in a tough environment; and a serious effort from government.

Government’s role is not to prop up outdated technologies and industries. But it should be fighting for good local jobs, supporting the industries of the future and creating the environment for them to thrive.

Put another way, the easy and lazy way—and the way of The Coalition and its business allies—is the knee-jerk cut wages and benefits. But, that road is a road to destroying the middle class.


@jonathantasini

Australian Industries

May 21, 2012

Q. How much do average Australians benefit from having strong industries in each of the following sectors?

Benefit a lot

Some benefit

A little benefit

No benefit

Don’t know

Tourism

45%

30%

11%

4%

10%

Agriculture

45%

29%

12%

4%

11%

Construction

44%

32%

11%

3%

10%

Mining

44%

31%

10%

4%

11%

Manufacturing

44%

30%

11%

4%

10%

Retail

40%

34%

11%

5%

10%

Hospitality

36%

36%

13%

4%

10%

Finance

34%

34%

15%

5%

11%

Telecommunications

31%

36%

17%

5%

11%

 Over 40% of respondents think the average Australian benefits a lot from having strong industries in tourism (45%), agriculture (45%), construction (44%), mining (44%) and manufacturing (44%).

Major demographic differences were –

60% of aged 55+ think there is a lot of benefit from manufacturing

62% of aged 55+ and 50% of Labor voters think there is a lot of benefit from construction

53% of aged 45-64 think there is a lot of benefit from retail

60% of aged 55+ and 52% of Labor voters think there is a lot of benefit from tourism

58% of aged 55+ and 48% of Coalition voters think there is a lot of benefit from mining

57% of aged 55+ think there is a lot of benefit from agriculture

Comments »

Will the Budget solve our two speed economy?

May 15, 2012


Paul Bastian welcomes the tax on mining profits and the Government’s continued commitment to manufacturing.

It’s no secret that the mining boom has pushed the dollar sky high and caused problems for manufacturers. But Paul Bastian believes the Government is right to be investing in the future and promoting maths and science.

He tells 3Q that innovation in manufacturing is the key to the future and it must be protected at all costs.

Pages:12»

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