Reflection of JobKeeper surplus

Jun 2, 2020

Q. Last Friday the Federal Government announced that, due to an accounting error, the number of people on JobKeeper is around half what the Treasury estimated it to be. The current cost of JobKeeper has consequently been reduced from $130b to $70b.

How do you think this reflects on the government’s credibility?

    Federal Voting Intention
Total Labor Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
Very poorly 18% 30% 6% 24% 22%
Quite poorly 23% 28% 16% 37% 27%
Quite well 11% 12% 14% 8% 5%
Very well 5% 4% 5% 0% 10%
Does not affect the Government’s credibility 43% 26% 59% 31% 37%
TOTAL: Poorly 41% 58% 21% 61% 49%
TOTAL: Well 16% 16% 19% 8% 15%
Base (n) 1,059 299 413 95 136
  •  43% of the public do not think the error causing the re-estimation of the JobKeeper cost affects the Government’s credibility, 41% think it reflects Very or Quite poorly.
  • Most Coalition voters do not think the issue has affected the credibility of the Government (59%), while the majority of Labor (58%) and Greens (61%) voters think it reflects poorly.

Alternative spending options for JobKeeper surplus

Jun 2, 2020

Q. On which of the following would you prefer the Government use the $60B it has previously allocated to the JobKeeper program?

    Federal Voting Intention
Total Labor Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
Extend financial schemes supporting those affected by the Covid-19 pandemic (JobSeeker increases, JobKeeper and free early  learning childcare) beyond their current end dates 35% 40% 28% 48% 29%
Broaden JobKeeper scheme to include universities, migrant workers and employees of companies owned by foreign governments 20% 23% 15% 25% 24%
Put money towards reducing national debt accumulate during the Covid-19 pandemic 45% 37% 57% 27% 47%
Base (n) 1,059 299 413 95 136
  •  A third of people would prefer the JobKeeper budget to be spent on extending the scheme beyond its current end date, with a further 20% preferring the scheme to be broadened to include more workers. 45% want the money to be put towards reducing the national debt.
  • Younger people (aged 18-34) are more likely to want the money extending (42%) or broadening the scheme (29%) compared to those over 55 (25% and 16%).
  • Over half of Coalition voters (57%) and retired people (58%) prefer using the money to reduce National debt, rather than providing more support for those who have lost work due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Returning to budget surplus

Feb 11, 2020

Q. Before the 2019 Federal election, the Government promised the 2019-2020 budget would return to surplus. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about achieving a budget surplus?

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Unsure
It’s more important to spend money on bushfire recovery than fund the surplus 79% 11% 50% 30% 7% 5% 9%
It’s understandable with the coronavirus impacting trade with China that the surplus won’t be achieved 65% 18% 25% 40% 12% 6% 17%
The government was wrong to announce the budget ‘was back in the black’ before the last election 57% 24% 25% 32% 17% 7% 19%
  • Four in five (79%) agree that it’s more important to spend money on bushfire recovery than fund the surplus; 65% agree that it’s understandable with the coronavirus impacting trade on China that the surplus won’t be achieved; and over half (57%) agree that the government was wrong to announce the budget ‘was back in the black’ before the last election.
  • Coalition voters are least likely to agree that the government was wrong to announce the budget ‘was back in the black’ before the last election (44%); while Labor (70%) and Greens (68%) voters are most likely to agree.

Budget compared to last year’s

May 19, 2015

Q. Do you think this budget is better or worse than last year’s budget?

  Total

 

  Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Total better 45% 39% 65% 28% 43%
Total worse 15% 21% 6% 33% 20%
Much better 11% 7% 23% 1% 4%
A little better 34% 32% 42% 27% 39%
About the same 31% 35% 25% 31% 30%
A little worse 10% 12% 5% 21% 14%
Much worse 5% 9% 1% 12% 6%
Don’t know 9% 5% 4% 7% 7%

45% think this year’s budget is better than last year’s and 15% think it is worse. 31% think it is about the same.

Those most likely to think it is better were Liberal/National voters (65%) and respondents aged 55+ (63%).

Impact of Federal Budget

May 19, 2015

Q. In general, do you think the Federal Budget, announced on Tuesday 12th May 2015 will be good or bad for?

  Total good Total bad

 

  Very good Good Neither good nor bad Bad Very bad Don’t know   2014 good 2014 bad
You personally 15% 28% 3% 12% 48% 19% 9% 9% 13% 52%
Average working people 22% 27% 3% 19% 41% 20% 7% 11% 14% 59%
Australian business 36% 23%
Small businesses 66% 6% 22% 44% 18% 4% 2% 11%
Big businesses 34% 10% 12% 22% 42% 8% 2% 16%
The economy over all 30% 22% 5% 25% 37% 16% 6% 11% 40% 32%
People who are well off 36% 14% 13% 23% 39% 12% 2% 11% 45% 16%
People on lower incomes 22% 34% 3% 19% 33% 21% 13% 11% 11% 66%
Australian families 29% 27% 5% 24% 34% 19% 8% 11% 11% 62%
Older Australians 20% 34% 3% 17% 35% 23% 11% 11% 10% 66%
Younger Australians 21% 29% 3% 18% 37% 20% 9% 13% 16% 55%

Two thirds (66%) of respondents think the budget will be good for small businesses.

Respondents also thought the budget was more likely to be good for big businesses (34% good/10% bad), the economy overall (30%/22%) and people who are well off (36%/14%).

Compared to last year’s budget, this year’s budget was considered better (or less bad) for all groups except the economy overall where good has dropped from 40% to 30% – and bad has dropped similarly, from 32% to 22%. For all groups, those who say the budget will be neither good nor bad has increased.

Statements about the budget

May 19, 2015

Q. Please indicate whether – in general – you agree with the following statements about the Federal budget that was handed down on Tuesday 12th May.

  Total agree Total dis-

agree

 

  Strongly agree Agree Neither Dis-

agree

Strongly dis-

agree

Don’t know
Overall, the budget is fair and balanced 28% 32% 4% 24% 28% 21% 11% 12%
This budget does not do enough to reduce the deficit 37% 18% 10% 27% 30% 15% 3% 14%
This was the budget Australia needs at this time 28% 31% 4% 24% 28% 19% 12% 14%
This budget favours businesses over workers 47% 12% 16% 31% 28% 10% 2% 13%
This budget fixes the problems in last year’s budget 20% 37% 3% 17% 29% 26% 11% 14%
This budget is more about improving the Government’s popularity than improving the economy 50% 19% 22% 28% 20% 13% 6% 11%

About half the respondents agree that the budget is “more about improving the Government’s popularity than improving the economy” (50%) and that the budget “favours businesses over workers” (47%). They were also more likely to think that the budget “does not do enough to reduce the deficit” (37% agree/18% disagree).

They were more likely to disagree that “this budget fixes the problems in last year’s budget” (20% agree/37% disagree) but split over whether the budget is “fair and balanced” or is “the budget Australia needs at this time”.

Budget Emergency

May 19, 2015

Q. Some people say that there is a “budget emergency” in Australia. Which of the following is closest to your view?

  Total

 

  Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   May 2014
I agree that there is a ‘budget emergency’ in Australia, and I believe that the recently announced budget changes will help bring the budget back into line. 19% 9% 39% 1% 8% 32%
I agree that there is a ‘budget emergency’ in Australia, but I don’t think the recently announced budget changes will help bring the budget back into line. 32% 34% 32% 26% 42% 24%
I do not believe we have a budget emergency in Australia 30% 40% 19% 54% 31% 32%
Don’t know 19% 17% 10% 19% 19% 11%

Overall, 51% of Australians agree that there is a budget emergency – down 5% since this time last year.

19% agree that there is a budget emergency and that the recent budget will help bring the budget back into line – down 13%. 32% (up 8%) agree that there is a budget emergency, but that the recent budget will not bring the budget back into line.

30% (down 2%) do not believe there is a budget emergency.

Labor (40%) and Greens (54%) voters were more likely to think that we do not have a budget emergency in Australia.

Government financial actions

Oct 14, 2014

Q. The government is considering savings and taxing options to pay for the war in Iraq, lower commodity prices and its inability to pass savings from its May budget this year. Would you approve or disapprove of the following actions it might take?

 

Total approve

Total dis-approve

 

Strongly approve

Approve

Dis-approve

Strongly dis-approve

Don’t know

Higher corporate tax

68%

22%

26%

42%

15%

7%

10%

Abandon its paid parental leave scheme

56%

31%

31%

25%

17%

14%

12%

Cuts to tax concessions in areas like superannuation

21%

67%

4%

17%

33%

34%

13%

Higher income taxes

21%

69%

5%

16%

31%

38%

10%

Cuts to social services, health or education

12%

81%

2%

10%

26%

55%

7%

A majority approve of higher corporate tax (68%) and abandoning the paid parental leave scheme (56%) to pay for the war in Iraq, lower commodity prices and the Government’s inability to pass savings from its May budget this year.

A majority would disapprove of cuts to social services, health or education (81%), higher income taxes (69%) and cuts to tax concessions in areas like superannuation (67%).

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