State Government – Co-operate or Compete

Apr 23, 2012

Q. When it comes to business expansion and investment in Australia, do you think that State Governments should co-operate with each other to attract business and investment or should they compete for business and investment by offering lower taxes and less regulation?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Should co-operate

67%

74%

64%

78%

Should compete

17%

16%

23%

5%

Don’t know

15%

10%

14%

16%

67% believe that State Governments should co-operate with each other to attract business and investment and 17% think they should compete for business and investment by offering lower taxes and less regulation.

23% of Liberal/National voters, 21% of men and 21% of NSW respondents think they should compete. Those most likely to think they should co-operate were Greens voters (78%), Labor voters (74%) and Queensland respondents (73%).

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Jobs reform

Oct 3, 2011

Q. To what extent do you agree that the following measures will improve job creation and investment in Australia?

Total Agree Total Disagree Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
Increasing the number of apprenticeships 88% 4% 38% 50% 4% 0% 7%
Giving incentives to companies that invest in research and development 79% 8% 26% 53% 7% 1% 12%
Boosting investment in renewable energy technologies 75% 11% 30% 45% 8% 3% 14%
Requiring companies to use Australian made steel in large infrastructure projects 73% 11% 27% 46% 9% 2% 15%
Implementing industrial relations changes that give more flexibility to business 57% 19% 13% 44% 14% 5% 24%
Bringing back tariffs on products imported from overseas 52% 29% 16% 36% 20% 9% 19%
Introducing industrial relations reforms to make it easier to hire and fire people 41% 41% 13% 28% 29% 12% 18%

Increasing the number of apprenticeships (88% total agree) is the most popular measure for improving job creation and investment in Australia, followed by giving incentives to companies that invest in research and development (79% total agree) and boosting investment in renewable energy technologies (75%).

Requiring companies to use Australian made steel in large infrastructure projects is also strongly endorsed by respondents (73% total agree).

The least popular measure is introducing industrial relations reforms to make it easier to hire and fire people (41% total disagree).   Asked with a different emphasis, there is significantly less opposition to the suggestion of implementing industrial relations changes that give more flexibility to business (19% total disagree).

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Jobs reform by Voting Intention

Oct 3, 2011

Q. To what extent do you agree that the following measures will improve job creation and investment in Australia?

Total Agree Total Agree – Labor Total Agree – Lib/Nat Total Agree- Greens
Increasing the number of apprenticeships 88% 89% 91% 87%
Giving incentives to companies that invest in research and development 79% 80% 83% 83%
Boosting investment in renewable energy technologies 75% 80% 71% 88%
Requiring companies to use Australian made steel in large infrastructure projects 73% 77% 77% 69%
Implementing industrial relations changes that give more flexibility to business 57% 45% 75% 41%
Bringing back tariffs on products imported from overseas 52% 52% 58% 40%
Introducing industrial relations reforms to make it easier to hire and fire people 41% 26% 65% 18%

Increasing the number of apprenticeships, giving incentives to companies that invest in research and development, and requiring companies to use Australia made steel in large infrastructure projects all receive a consistent level of endorsement across party lines.

Labor voters are more likely to agree with boosting investment in renewable energy technologies (80% total agree) as a measure to improve job creation and investment in Australia, as are Greens voters (88% total agree).

Labor voters are less likely to agree with implementing industrial relations changes that give more flexibility to business (45% total agree) and introducing industrial relations reforms to make it easier to hire and fire people (26% total agree).

Coalition voters are the most likely to agree with the industrial relations reforms, with 75% agreeing with implementing industrial relations changes that give more flexibility to business and 65% agreeing with introducing industrial relations reforms to make it easier to hire and fire people.

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RSPT

Jun 15, 2010

Q. Which of the following statements is closest to your view in relation to the Government’s proposed resources super profits tax?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat
The new tax will result in mining companies cutting back on their investments in Australia and there will be a significant loss of Australian jobs 42% 16% 72%
Mining companies will continue to make large profits. They are just trying to avoid paying their fair share of tax. 40% 69% 16%
Don’t know 17% 15% 11%

Respondents were split over which statement best described their view of the Government’s proposed resources super profits tax – 42% agreed “the new tax will result in mining companies cutting back on their investments in Australia and there will be a significant loss of Australian jobs” and 40% agreed “mining companies will continue to make large profits. They are just trying to avoid paying their fair share of tax”.

Opinions were strongly related to party preference – 69% of Labor voters agreed that “mining companies will continue to make large profits. They are just trying to avoid paying their fair share of tax” and 72% of Liberal/National voters agreed that “the new tax will result in mining companies cutting back on their investments in Australia and there will be a significant loss of Australian jobs”.

53% of those on low incomes (<$600pw) agreed that “mining companies will continue to make large profits. They are just trying to avoid paying their fair share of tax”. Comments »

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