Government spending on energy sources

Mar 10, 2020

Q To what extent would you support or oppose the Government spending taxpayers’ money to research the following energy sources?

  NET: Support NET: Oppose Strongly support Somewhat support Neither support nor oppose Somewhat oppose Strongly oppose
Renewables (such as large-scale solar or wind farms) 71% 12% 45% 27% 16% 7% 5%
Hydrogen technology 57% 10% 24% 33% 32% 7% 3%
Clean coal 50% 23% 20% 29% 28% 11% 11%
Nuclear 38% 35% 17% 21% 27% 15% 20%

 

    Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention Location
NET: Support Total Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other Capital City Non-Capital City
Renewables (such as large-

scale solar or wind farms)

71% 71% 72% 74% 69% 72% 78% 66% 95% 63% 74% 67%
Hydrogen technology 57% 65% 51% 53% 52% 66% 58% 61% 63% 54% 59% 53%
Clean coal 50% 50% 50% 49% 44% 56% 43% 64% 28% 48% 51% 47%
Nuclear 38% 47% 30% 32% 34% 47% 34% 50% 25% 37% 39% 36%
  • 71% of participants support the Government spending taxpayers’ money to research renewables, compared to 50% support for clean coal.
  • Support for research into renewables is higher in capital cities (74%) than non-capital cities (67%), and higher among Greens voters (95%) than all other voters (63%).
  • Coalition voters are most likely to support research into clean coal (64%) and nuclear power (50%) whereas Greens voters are least likely to support those energy sources (28% and 25% respectively).
  • Men tend to support research into hydrogen technology (65%) and nuclear (47%) more than women (51% and 30% respectively).
  • Participants over 55 years are more likely to support research into hydrogen technology (66%), clean coal (56%) or nuclear (47%) than those aged 18-54 (52%, 46% and 33% respectively).

South Australian battery

Jul 18, 2017

Q. It was recently announced by the South Australian government that technology company Tesla will construct the “world’s largest battery” in South Australia. The battery will store wind energy to be used in high-demand periods, with the aim of increasing the reliability of the South Australian energy grid. Do you think this is a good idea or a bad idea?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Total good idea 73%   79% 70% 82% 69%
Total bad idea 5%   1% 8% 1% 11%
Very good idea 42%   48% 40% 46% 39%
Good idea 31%   31% 30% 36% 30%
Neither god nor bad idea 14%   12% 14% 13% 14%
Bad idea 2%   1% 3% 1% 5%
Very bad idea 3%   <1% 5% 6%
Don’t know 8%   8% 7% 3% 6%

73% agree that the construction of the battery in South Australia is a good idea and 5% think it is a bad idea. Those most likely to think it is a good idea were Greens voters (82%), Labor voters (79%) and university educated (79%).

65% of South Australian respondents think it is a good idea, 8% think it is a bad idea and 22% think it is neither. (note – small sample)

Can a price on carbon create jobs?

Jul 3, 2012



Tim Ayres tells manufacturers to focus on opportunities in clean energy and new government subsidies.

Despite the hyperbole on one side and scaremongering on the other, the much debated carbon tax is in place. For manufacturers, the carbon tax is a game shifter heralding new beginnings but also some losses.

Tim Ayres for the AMWU tells 3Q about the opportunities and challenges to Australia’s clean, green future. Though the Government has committed billions in loans through the Clean Energy Finance Corporation kick-starting a clean technology industry in wind, solar and geothermal will mean putting the right policies in place so that local workers benefit.

COVID-19 RESEARCH

Read Essential's ongoing research on the public response to Covid-19.

Download this week's Report

Sign up for updates

Receive the Essential Report in your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.