Federal politics – voting intention

Feb 22, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1834 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 37%    
National 3%    
Total Lib/Nat 40% 46% +1%
Labor 43% 54% -1%
Greens 8%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 7%    

 NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.   Comments »

Reintroduction of WorkChoices under an Abbott Liberal Government

Feb 22, 2010

 Q. How likely do you think it is that Tony Abbott and the Liberals will reintroduce at least some parts of WorkChoices if they win the next election?

  Total Labor Coalition Green
Very likely 22% 41% 7% 26%
Quite likely 35% 36% 43% 39%
Not very likely 18% 8% 29% 15%
Not at all likely 5% 4% 7% 4%
Don’t know 20% 11% 14% 16%
Total likely 57% 77% 50% 65%
Total not likely 23% 12% 36% 19%

 Over half (57%) of Australians surveyed think that if Tony Abbott and the Liberals win the next election it is likely that they will introduce at least some parts of WorkChoices, 23% think it is unlikely and 20% don’t know.

 77% of Labor voters, 65% of Green voters and 50% of Coalition voters think that it is likely that at least some parts of WorkChoices will be introduced if Abbott and the Liberals win the next election. 

 People aged 45 – 55 were more likely to think that if the Liberal party wins the next election, at least some parts of WorkChoices will be introduced (68%), while people aged 65 years and over were more inclined to think it is unlikely some parts of WorkChoices will be introduced if the Liberals win the next election (32%).   Comments »

Future of WorkChoices

Feb 22, 2010

Q. Do you believe Tony Abbott when he says that WorkChoices is dead and would not be reintroduced by a future Liberal Government?

  %
Yes 22%
No 50%
Don’t know 28%

 Half (50%) of those surveyed do not believe Tony Abbott when he says that WorkChoices is dead and would not be reintroduced by a future Liberal Government, 22% believe Abbott and 28% don’t know.

 Results followed party lines – Labor (75%) and Green (80%) voters were more likely to not believe Abbott, while Coalition voters were more likely to believe Abbott when he says WorkChoices is dead and won’t be reintroduced (50%). 

 People aged 65 years and over were more likely to believe Abbott (39%) while those aged 18 – 24 were more likely to indicate they don’t know (36%).  Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

Feb 15, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1830 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 36%    
National 2%    
Total Lib/Nat 38% 45%
Labor 44% 55%
Greens 10%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 6%    

 NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.

Federal politics – voting intention

Feb 8, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1868 sample size Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

Feb 2, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1937 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 35%    
National 3%    
Total Lib/Nat 38% 44%
Labor 45% 56%
Greens 9%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 6%    

 NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.   Comments »

Firmness of vote

Feb 2, 2010

Q. Would you say your choice is very firm, pretty firm but you might change your mind, or might you consider another party and leader as the campaign develops?

  Total Labor Coalition Green
Very firm 48% 54% 55% 31%
Pretty firm but I might change my mind 33% 33% 32% 43%
Might consider another party and leader closer to an election 17% 12% 12% 24%
Don’t know 2% 1% 1% 1%

 Just under half (48%) of those surveyed consider their voting choice as ‘very firm’, 33% consider their voting choice as ‘pretty firm but might change my mind’ and 17% ‘might consider another party and leader closer to an election’.

 Labor and Coalition voters were more likely to indicate their voting choice as ‘very firm’ (54% Labor, 55% Coalition), while Green voters were more likely to indicate their choice as ‘pretty firm, but I might change my mind’ (43%).

 People aged 55 years and over were more likely to consider their voting choice ‘very firm’ (60%), people aged 25 – 34 were more likely to indicate it as ‘pretty firm but I might change my mind’ (43%), while 18 – 24 year olds were more likely to indicate they ‘might consider another party and leader closer to an election’ (29%).   Comments »

Political campaigning in public spaces

Feb 2, 2010

Q. Politicians may be banned from campaigning in major shopping centres because the Shopping Centre Council claims that it causes too much disruption for shoppers. Do you agree or disagree with banning politicians from campaigning in shopping centres?

  %
Total agree 57%
Total disagree 28%
Strong agree 26%
Agree 31%
Disagree 22%
Strongly disagree 6%
Don’t know 15%

 More than half (57%) of those surveyed agree with banning politicians from campaigning in shopping centres, 28% disagree and 15% don’t know. 

 Coalition voters were more likely than Labor voters to agree with banning politicians from campaigning in shopping centres (60% v 55%). 

 Results were reasonably consistent across age groups; however people in the 45 – 54 age group were slightly more likely to agree (60%). 

 People in South Australia were more likely than those living in other states to agree with banning politicians from campaigning in shopping centres (71%).  Comments »

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