Attitudes towards Queensland border closure

Sep 22, 2020

Q. To what extent do you support or oppose the Queensland state government decision to close its borders to Victoria, New South Wales and ACT to prevent the spread of Covid-19?

  Total State
  NSW VIC QLD SA WA
Strongly oppose 13% 20% 14% 10% 5% 1%
Somewhat oppose 13% 16% 13% 12% 7% 7%
Somewhat support 31% 34% 35% 20% 23% 31%
Strongly support 36% 23% 29% 50% 55% 54%
Unsure 8% 7% 10% 8% 9% 7%
TOTAL: Oppose 25% 36% 26% 22% 13% 8%
TOTAL: Support 66% 57% 64% 70% 78% 85%
Base (n) 1,081 352 274 212 85 104

 

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor Liberal + National Greens TOTAL: Other
Strongly oppose 13% 15% 10% 6% 11% 19% 9% 17% 8% 24%
Somewhat oppose 13% 15% 11% 14% 11% 14% 9% 18% 12% 15%
Somewhat support 31% 31% 30% 40% 29% 25% 35% 30% 32% 24%
Strongly support 36% 33% 39% 30% 39% 38% 39% 31% 40% 30%
Unsure 8% 7% 10% 10% 10% 5% 8% 4% 8% 7%
TOTAL: Oppose 25% 30% 22% 20% 22% 33% 17% 35% 20% 39%
TOTAL: Support 66% 64% 69% 70% 67% 62% 74% 61% 73% 54%
Base (n) 1,081 539 542 338 374 369 298 460 115 104
  • Two-thirds (66%) of Australians support the closure of its internal borders. Support for the decision is high in Queensland (70%), WA (85%) and SA (78%) support is lower in NSW (57%).

State of the economy

Sep 22, 2020

Q. Overall, how would you describe the current state of the Australian economy?

  Sep’20 Sep’19 May’18 Nov’17 May’17 Dec’16
Very good 8% 5% 8% 3% 3% 2%
Quite good 16% 27% 31% 30% 27% 21%
Neither good, nor poor 30% 32% 32% 38% 36% 37%
Quite poor 32% 25% 18% 17% 23% 28%
Very poor 14% 8% 6% 7% 6% 8%
Unsure 2% 3% 5% 5% 5% 4%
NET: Good 23% 32% 39% 33% 30% 23%
NET: Poor 46% 33% 24% 24% 29% 36%
Base (n) 1,081 1,097 1,033 1,021 1,007 1,001

 

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Very good 8% 11% 4% 9% 12% 1%
Quite good 16% 18% 13% 21% 16% 11%
Neither good, nor poor 30% 28% 31% 34% 30% 26%
Quite poor 32% 30% 33% 23% 29% 41%
Very poor 14% 12% 16% 9% 12% 20%
Unsure 2% 1% 2% 3% 1% 1%
NET: Good 23% 29% 17% 30% 28% 12%
NET: Poor 46% 42% 49% 33% 41% 61%
Base (n) 1,081 539 542 338 374 369

 

  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens Independent / Other
Very good 8% 4% 10% 7% 9%
Quite good 16% 13% 20% 13% 13%
Neither good, nor poor 30% 26% 29% 33% 29%
Quite poor 32% 38% 28% 34% 33%
Very poor 14% 18% 12% 12% 16%
Unsure 2% 1% 1% 2% 0%
NET: Good 23% 17% 30% 19% 22%
NET: Poor 46% 56% 39% 46% 49%
Base (n) 1,081 298 460 115 104
  • Rating of the state of the economy has fallen in the last year in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. Now 23% of people the state of the economy as very or quite good, down 9%pts from 32% last year. Over the same time those rating the economy as poor (very/quite) has increased from 33% to 46%.
  • Those most pessimistic about the state of the economy include women (17% rating very/quite good, down from 30% last year), people aged over 55 (12%, down from 31% last year) Labor voters (17%) and Greens voters (19%).
  • Rating of the economy among Coalition voters has dropped from 45% very/quite good in Sep’19 to 30% this year.

Indictors of whether the Australian economy is in a good or poor state

Sep 22, 2020

Q. Which of the following indicators do you think is the most important when thinking about whether the Australian economy is in a good or poor state?

  Sep’20 Sep’19
The unemployment rate 39% 25%
The cost of household bills 13% 22%
The value of the Australian dollar to international currencies 12% 13%
The amount of homeless people on the streets 8% 10%
The interest rate set by Reserve Bank of Australia 6% 9%
The gross domestic product per person 7% 8%
The consumer price index 6% 6%
The size of the national surplus 6% 6%
The number of new shops, restaurants and cafes opening 3% 2%
Base (n) 1,081 1,097

 

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
The unemployment rate 39% 34% 44% 38% 42% 38%
The cost of household bills 13% 12% 14% 14% 14% 11%
The value of the Australian dollar to international currencies 12% 13% 10% 19% 9% 8%
The amount of homeless people on the streets 8% 10% 7% 9% 9% 7%
The interest rate set by Reserve Bank of Australia 6% 5% 6% 2% 7% 8%
The gross domestic product per person 7% 9% 5% 4% 6% 10%
The consumer price index 6% 8% 4% 8% 5% 5%
The size of the national surplus 6% 5% 8% 4% 5% 9%
The number of new shops, restaurants and cafes opening 3% 4% 3% 3% 3% 4%
Base (n) 1,081 539 542 338 374 369
  • People rating the unemployment level as the key indicator for a healthy economy has increased in the past 12 months from 25% to 39% while the cost of household bills has fallen from 22% to 13%. All other indicators remain consistent.

State of the economy in next six months

Sep 22, 2020

Q. How do you think the economy will look in the next six months?

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
The economy will improve in the next six months 25% 29% 21% 27% 29% 20%
The economy will stay the same in the next six months 39% 37% 40% 43% 37% 37%
The economy will get worse in the next six months 36% 33% 39% 30% 35% 43%
Base (n) 1,081 539 542 338 374 369

 

  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens Independent / Other
The economy will improve in the next six months 25% 24% 31% 19% 19%
The economy will stay the same in the next six months 39% 35% 41% 38% 35%
The economy will get worse in the next six months 36% 40% 28% 43% 46%
Base (n) 1,081 298 460 115 104
  • A quarter of people expect the economy to improve in the next months, lower than the 36% who expect it to get worse. 39% do not expect any change.
  • Older people aged over 55 are more likely than those aged 18-34 to expect the economy to get worse over the next six months (43% to 30%).
  • 31% of Coalition voters think the economy will improve in the next six months, compared to 24% of Labor voters, 19% of Greens voters and 19% of independent/other minor party voters.

Effectiveness of higher income earners tax cuts at stimulating the economy

Sep 22, 2020

Q. The federal government is considering bringing forward tax cuts currently planned for 2022 which will give higher income earners much bigger tax cuts than those on lower incomes.

Which of these options do you most support?

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor Liberal + National Greens TOTAL: Other
The government should bring forward these tax cuts to this year 33% 34% 31% 33% 41% 24% 28% 40% 26% 29%
The government should stick to the existing timetable of 2022 29% 31% 27% 40% 25% 24% 29% 31% 28% 26%
The government should scrap these tax cuts and spend the money on other priorities 38% 35% 42% 27% 34% 52% 43% 29% 46% 45%
Base (n) 1,081 539 542 338 374 369 298 460 115 104

 

  Total Household Income
  TOTAL: Lower Income

(Up to $51,999 per year)

TOTAL: Mid Income ($52,000-$103,999 per year) TOTAL: Higher Income

(More than $104,000 per year)

The government should bring forward these tax cuts to this year 33% 25% 29% 46%
The government should stick to the existing timetable of 2022 29% 24% 33% 27%
The government should scrap these tax cuts and spend the money on other priorities 38% 50% 37% 27%
Base (n) 1,081 359 318 317
  • 33% would support a decision to fast-track tax cuts for high income earners from 2022 to 2020. 29% think the cuts should keep to the existing timetable of 2022, while 38% think they should be scrapped.
  • Fast-tracking the tax cuts has greatest support among those with a high household income (46%), while only 25% of those in a household with a lower income, and 29% of people in a mid-income household.

Effectiveness of higher income earners tax cuts at stimulating the economy

Sep 22, 2020

Q. Thinking about tax cuts which benefit higher income earners, which of the following statements is closer to your views?

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor Liberal + National Greens TOTAL: Other
Tax cuts for higher income earners are very effective at stimulating the economy because people will spend the additional money 21% 24% 18% 23% 28% 13% 17% 27% 12% 20%
Tax cuts for higher income earners are only moderately effective at stimulating the economy because only some of the additional money will be spent 41% 41% 40% 52% 38% 33% 36% 45% 45% 38%
Tax cuts for higher income earners are not effective at stimulating the economy because people will save and not spend any additional money they receive 38% 35% 42% 25% 34% 54% 47% 28% 43% 42%
Base (n) 1,081 539 542 338 374 369 298 460 115 104

 

  Total Household Income
  TOTAL: Lower Income

(Up to $51,999 per year)

TOTAL: Mid Income ($52,000-$103,999 per year) TOTAL: Higher Income

(More than $104,000 per year)

Tax cuts for higher income earners are very effective at stimulating the economy because people will spend the additional money 21% 18% 24% 23%
Tax cuts for higher income earners are only moderately effective at stimulating the economy because only some of the additional money will be spent 41% 34% 39% 49%
Tax cuts for higher income earners are not effective at stimulating the economy because people will save and not spend any additional money they receive 38% 48% 37% 27%
Base (n) 1,081 359 318 317
  • One in five people (21%) believe tax cuts for higher income earners are very effective at stimulating the economy. 41% think they are only moderately effective at stimulating the economy and 38% believe they are not effective.
  • Even among living in household with an annual income of over $100k, just 23% think these tax cuts would be very effective at stimulating the economy, while 49% say they would be moderately effective and 27% say they would not be effective

Priorities for upcoming Federal Budget

Sep 22, 2020

Q. From the options below, which of the following initiatives should the government prioritise in the upcoming Federal Budget in October?

Please select your top three choices with 1 being the top priority, 2 being the second top priority and 3 being the third top priority.

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
TOTAL: TOP 3 Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor Liberal + National Greens TOTAL: Other
Build more affordable housing 60% 57% 64% 60% 57% 64% 66% 54% 61% 56%
Invest in renewable energy projects 52% 53% 50% 45% 52% 56% 48% 51% 66% 54%
Invest in large-scale infrastructure projects (e.g. roads, transport networks, ports etc.) 48% 51% 45% 37% 47% 58% 41% 59% 26% 55%
Extend JobKeeper and JobSeeker payments at current rate 47% 47% 47% 52% 45% 45% 52% 39% 61% 44%
Directly fund jobs in aged care 41% 36% 46% 35% 37% 51% 41% 41% 35% 44%
Establish a universally accessible early learning system 27% 29% 25% 38% 31% 13% 29% 24% 33% 27%
Fast-track tax cuts for higher income earners 25% 28% 23% 33% 31% 13% 22% 31% 20% 21%
Base (n) 1,081 539 542 338 374 369 298 460 115 104
  • Building more affordable houses was the most selected issue, with 60% rating this as a Top 3 priority for the Government in the next budget. Investing in renewable energy (52%), investment in large-scale infrastructure (48%) and the extension of JobKeeper and JobKeeper (47%) also rated highly.
  • Fast-tracking tax cuts was considered a Top 3 priority for 25% of people.
  • Coalition voters were more likely to select investment in renewable energy (51%) than the fast-tracking of tax cuts for higher income earners (31%) as a priority issue. Investment in large-scale infrastructure (59%), build affordable housing (54%) and investment in renewables (51%) were the most selected priorities among Coalition voters.

Support for loan system for aged care

Sep 22, 2020

Q. The Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Assurance is investigating the current funding system for residential support and aged care. One suggestion for improvement is to introduce a loan scheme to pay for a person’s care in retirement. The personal loan is paid off using the person’s assets only after they die, with any outstanding loan amount covered by the government.

To what extent would you support or oppose this loan system for aged care if it were introduced?

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor Liberal + National Greens TOTAL: Other
Strongly oppose 12% 12% 12% 7% 12% 17% 10% 9% 18% 23%
Somewhat oppose 18% 20% 16% 19% 18% 18% 22% 17% 22% 16%
Somewhat support 37% 40% 34% 43% 35% 33% 39% 41% 32% 27%
Strongly support 11% 13% 10% 13% 13% 8% 10% 16% 9% 5%
Unsure 22% 15% 28% 18% 23% 24% 19% 16% 19% 30%
TOTAL: Oppose 30% 32% 29% 25% 29% 35% 32% 27% 41% 38%
TOTAL: Support 48% 53% 44% 56% 47% 41% 49% 57% 41% 32%
Base (n) 1,081 539 542 338 374 369 298 460 115 104
  • Just under half of people (48%) say they would support (somewhat/strongly) a change of funding for aged care to a loan-style system. Under a third opposed the idea (30%) and a further fifth (22%) were unsure.
  • Younger people aged 18-34 were more supportive of the suggestion than those aged over 55 (56% to 41%). There was high support among Coalition voters (57%).
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