Tony Abbott’s Immigration Policy

Aug 2, 2010

Q. Tony Abbott has proposed to cut immigration from around 300,000 a year to 170,000? Do you approve or disapprove of this cut to immigration?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Liberal/ National Vote Greens
Total approve 64% 52% 91% 38%
Total disapprove 22% 32% 6% 49%
Strongly approve 33% 20% 56% 16%
Approve 31% 32% 35% 22%
Disapprove 15% 22% 5% 30%
Strongly disapprove 7% 10% 1% 19%
Don’t know 14% 16% 3% 13%

 64% approve Tony Abbott’s proposal to cut immigration and 22% oppose. There is strong support for cutting immigration from Liberal/National voters (91%) – while Labor voters (52% approve/32% disapprove) and Greens voters (38%/49%) are split. Comments »

Best to handle Immigration Issues

Aug 2, 2010

Q. Which leader and party do you trust most to handle immigration issues?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Liberal/ National Vote Greens
Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party 35% 6% 83% 9%
Julia Gillard and the Labor Party 23% 50% 3% 27%
No difference 31% 35% 11% 56%
Don’t know 10% 9% 3% 8%

 Overall, Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party are trusted most to handle immigration issues (35% to 23%). 31% think there is no difference between the major parties on immigration.

 83% of Liberal/National voters trust Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party most and 50% of Labor voters trust Julia Gillard and the Labor Party. 56% of Greens voters think there is no difference. Comments »

Party Best at

Jun 15, 2010

Q. Which of the following parties – Labor, Liberal or Greens – do you think is the best party when it comes to –

Labor Liberal Greens Don’t know
Representing the interests of Australian working people 42% 27% 6% 25%
Standing up to the big multinational corporations 32% 27% 13% 28%
Handling the economy in a way that best protects working people in Australia 36% 35% 4% 25%
Understanding the needs of the average Australian 29% 27% 9% 35%
Representing the interests of you and people like you 32% 34% 10% 24%
Having a vision for Australia’s future 29% 33% 9% 29%
Taking Australia forward, not backwards 29% 34% 9% 28%
Handling Australia’s relations with other countries 30% 38% 4% 27%
Handling Australia’s economy 30% 42% 3% 25%
Dealing with the issue of immigration 20% 41% 7% 32%
Being honest and ethical 19% 21% 15% 45%
Handling environmental and climate change issues 19% 19% 36% 27%

The Labor Party was thought to be better than the Liberal Party at “representing the interests of Australian working people” (42% to 27%) and “standing up to the big multinational corporations “ (32%/27%).

The Liberal Party was thought to be better than the Labor Party at “dealing with the issue of immigration “ (41% to 20%), “handling Australia’s economy” (42%/30%),  “handling Australia’s relations with other countries” (38%/30%),  “taking Australia forward, not backwards” (34%/29%) and “having a vision for Australia’s future” (33%/29%).

There was little difference between the Liberal and Labor Parties in terms of “handling the economy in a way that best protects working people in Australia”,  “understanding the needs of the average Australian” and “representing the interests of you and people like you”.

36% believed the Greens were best at “handling environmental and climate change issues” and 45% could not nominate a party best at “being honest and ethical”. Comments »

Asylum Seekers – Awareness of Annual Intake

Jun 7, 2010

 Q. From what you have read and heard, what percentage of Australia’s annual immigration intake are asylum seekers arriving by boat?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
50% or more 10% 10% 12% 6%
About 25% 15% 15% 17% 8%
About 10% 13% 12% 15% 13%
About 5% 15% 12% 17% 18%
1% or less 18% 21% 17% 26%
Don’t know 30% 30% 22% 28%

 38% of respondents think asylum seekers arriving by boat make up at least 10% of Australia’s immigration intake – 15% think it about 5% and 18% think it is 1% or less.

 26% of Greens voters think it is 1% or less and 44% of Liberal/National voters think it is 10% or more.

26% of people aged 45-64 think it is 1% or less. Comments »

Important Election Issues

May 10, 2010

Q8. Which are the three most important issues in deciding how you would vote at a Federal election? (Number from 1 to 3 where 1 is the most important, 2 the second most important, etc)

  One Two Three Total Total

25 Jan 10

Difference
Management of the economy 34% 18% 10% 62% 63% -1%
Ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system  14% 20% 16% 50% 48% +2%
Australian jobs and protection of local industries 8% 10% 11% 29% 33% -4%
Ensuring a fair taxation system 5% 8% 9% 22% 18% +4%
Ensuring a quality education for all children 3% 7% 9% 19% 23% -4%
Housing affordability 6% 5% 6% 17% 14% +3%
Controlling interest rates 5% 5% 6% 16% 15% +1%
Managing population growth 3% 4% 7% 14% *  
Protecting the environment 3% 5% 5% 13% 16% -3%
Political leadership 5% 3% 4% 12% 23% -11%
Addressing climate change 4% 4% 4% 12% 16% -4%
Fair immigration policies 3% 4% 3% 10% *  
A fair industrial relations system 2% 4% 3% 9% 10% -1%
Ensuring a quality water supply 2% 2% 3% 7% 12% -5%
Security and the war on terrorism 2% 2% 3% 7% 9% -2%

*Not asked in January 2010 poll

 62% of people surveyed rate management of the economy is one of their three most important issues, followed by 50% that rate ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system and 29% that rate Australian jobs and protection of local industries as one of their three most important issues.

 Only 9% rate a fair industrial relations system as one of their three most important issues and 7% rate security and the war on terrorism and ensuring a quality water supply. 

 The major change since the previous survey in January, was a drop in the importance of political leadership from 23% to 12%. Ensuring a fairer tax system has risen slightly from 18% to 22%. Comments »

Immigration and the Government

Apr 19, 2010

Q. Thinking about immigration, should the Government provide incentives for new migrants to settle in specific regions of Australia which need and can cope with higher populations?

  %
Should provide incentives to settle in specific regions 55%
Should not provide incentives to settle in specific regions 30%
Don’t know 15%

55% agreed that the Government should provide incentives for new migrants to settle in specific regions of Australia which need and can cope with higher populations and 30% disagreed.

 Those most likely to agree were Greens voters (74%), Labor voters (62%) and high income earners (60% of incomes over $1,600 per week).

Liberal/National voters split 54% should/36% should not. Comments »

Australia’s population

Apr 19, 2010

Q. Do you think Australia needs a larger population, a smaller population or about the same population in the following areas?

 

 

Larger population

Smaller population

Same population

Don’t know

Large capital cities – Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane

7%

36%

51%

6%

Other capital cities like Adelaide, Perth, Hobart

36%

12%

44%

7%

Major regional centres

56%

8%

28%

8%

Smaller regional towns

64%

6%

22%

7%

 

 

There was strong support for increased population in the less populated areas of Australia.

 

Only 7% supported larger populations in the major capitals cities, while 36% supported larger populations in Adelaide, Perth and Hobart.

 

More than half supported larger populations in major regional centres (56%) and smaller regional towns (64%).

 

Opinions about the populations of the major capitals were similar across states, but respondents from SA/WA/Tasmania were less likely to want larger populations in their capitals cities (22% want larger population and 61% the same population).

 

Liberal voters and Greens voters were more likely to favour larger populations in regional areas. 61% of Liberal voters favoured larger populations in regional centres and 70% in smaller towns. 70% of Greens voters favoured larger populations in regional centres and 79% in smaller towns.

Federal Labor’s approach to asylum seekers

Apr 6, 2010

Q. Do you think the Federal Labor Government is too tough or too soft on asylum seekers or is it taking the right approach?

  %
Too tough 6%
Too soft 65%
Taking the right approach 18%
Don’t know 11%

Most people (65%) think the Federal Labor Government is too soft on asylum seekers, 18% think the Government is taking the right approach, 6% think they are too tough and 11% don’t know.

Labor voters were more likely to think the Government is taking the right approach (31%), Coalition voters were more likely to think the Government is being too soft (90%) and Green voters were more likely to think the approach is too tough (24%).  

56% of Labor voters and 25% of Green voters think the Government is being too soft on asylum seekers. 

18 – 24 year olds were more likely to think the Government is taking the right approach (29%), while people aged 55 years and over were more likely to think the Government is too soft on asylum seekers (76%).

Males were more likely than females to think the Government is being too soft (69% v 62%). 

When we asked a similar question in April last year, we found that 55% thought the Government was being too soft on asylum seekers, 26% thought the Government’s approach was about right and 4% thought the Government was too tough.  Comments »

Pages:«123»

COVID-19 RESEARCH

Read Essential's ongoing research on the public response to Covid-19.

Download this week's Report

Sign up for updates

Receive the Essential Report in your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.