Institutional Racism in Australia

Jun 10, 2020

Q. Institutional racism is where the institutions in a society are biased in a way that means particular ethnic groups are disadvantaged.

For example, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be arrested in some situations; whereas, white (European) Australians are more likely to be warned, cautioned or diverted away from the criminal justice system. Additionally, Indigenous Australians are more likely to die in custody than white Australians. To some people these arguments show that there is institutional racism against Indigenous Australians.

Which of the following best describes your view of institutional racism in Australia?

  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
There is no racism in Australian police forces 9% 7% 11% 8% 11%
While there may be isolated incidents involving racism, police forces in Australia are not institutionally racist against Indigenous Australians 43% 40% 54% 21% 50%
There is institutional racism in Australian police forces which is shown through many examples of discrimination against Indigenous Australians 30% 36% 19% 56% 29%
I do not know enough about the issue to provide a view 18% 16% 16% 15% 10%
Base (n) 1,073 325 419 90 136

Lock ‘Em Out

Aug 6, 2012

A quick update on something I pointed out three weeks ago — union workers know a lot more about how to stop alcohol-fuelled violence than most politicians because they are on the front lines.

Two years ago– TWO YEARS AGO — a coalition of unions representing doctors, nurses, paramedics and police officers demanded that politicians act to stop alcohol-fuelled violence. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to understand why: those front-line workers have to deal with the violence and it’s an occupational hazard. Union workers have to transport injured people to hospitals, stitch up the wounds, and restore order in the streets.

So, today’s news vindicates the campaign being run by the Last Drinks campaign:

PUB lockouts that ban patrons entering licensed premises after a late night deadline but allow those already inside to keep drinking could be the answer to curbing drunken violence in Kings Cross, Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione believes.

Save lives. Sign the petition.


@jonathantasini

Appropriate Police Responses

Apr 2, 2012

Q. There is a debate in many parts of Australia on the appropriate response of police to a range of situations.

In your opinion which of the following are appropriate responses for police in the following situations? (Version A – asked of half the sample)

 

Appropriate police responses

 

Situation

Firearm

Taser

Capsicum spray

Baton

Physical restraint

Verbal response

Don’t know

Police confronted with an armed individual

67%

42%

30%

20%

26%

23%

6%

Police confronted with a drug (eg ice amphetamines) or alcohol affected individual

10%

44%

47%

22%

43%

26%

5%

Police confronted with a mentally ill individual (eg schizophrenic episode)

6%

31%

39%

15%

48%

34%

7%

Police confronted with a gang or mob

47%

44%

43%

33%

32%

26%

9%

A substantial proportion of respondents think that firearms are an appropriate police response when confronted with an armed individual (67%) or confronted with a gang or mob (47%).

Tasers are more likely to be considered appropriate when confronted with a drug or alcohol affected individual (44%), a gang or mob (44%) or an armed individual (42%).

Capsicum spray is more likely to be considered appropriate when confronted with a drug or alcohol affected individual (47%) or a gang or mob (43%).

Physical restraint is thought to be more appropriate to situations where police are confronted with a mentally ill individual (48%) or a drug or alcohol affected individual (43%).

Comments »

Most Appropriate Police Response

Apr 2, 2012

Q. There is a debate in many parts of Australia on the appropriate response of police to a range of situations.

In your opinion which of the following is the most appropriate response for police in the following situations? (Version B – asked of half the sample).

 

Most appropriate police response

 

Situation

Firearm

Taser

Capsicum spray

Baton

Physical restraint

Verbal response

Don’t know

Police confronted with an armed individual

55%

25%

7%

2%

2%

1%

8%

Police confronted with a drug (eg ice amphetamines) or alcohol affected individual

5%

37%

28%

3%

18%

2%

7%

Police confronted with a mentally ill individual (eg schizophrenic episode)

2%

24%

24%

1%

31%

10%

7%

Police confronted with a gang or mob

39%

19%

19%

8%

3%

2%

9%

A firearm was considered to be the most appropriate police response when confronted with an armed individual (55%) or a gang or mob (39%).

When confronted with a drug or alcohol affected individual the most appropriate responses were thought to be taser (37%) and capsicum spray (28%).

When confronted with a mentally ill individual the most appropriate responses were thought to be physical restraint (31%), taser (24%) and capsicum spray (24%).

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Careers

Apr 27, 2011

Q. Which of the following occupations do you think provide good careers for young people?

Yes No Don’t know
Trades 88% 6% 6%
Computing and information technology 86% 6% 7%
Nursing 78% 15% 7%
Teaching 75% 17% 8%
Tourism and hospitality 72% 19% 9%
Police 71% 20% 9%
Defence forces 71% 20% 9%
Banking and finance 70% 19% 10%
Retail 54% 36% 10%

The most favoured occupations for providing good careers were thought to be trades (88%), computing and IT (86%) and nursing (78%).

All occupations tested scored at least 70% except for retail at 54%.

Younger respondents (aged 18-35) tended to have a similar order of preference to the general population – their most favoured occupations were trades (78%), computing and IT (76%), teaching (68%) and nursing (67%).

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