Concern about Issues

Nov 8, 2010

Q. How concerned are you personally about each of the following economic issues facing Australia today?

  Very concerned Somewhat concerned Not so concerned Not at all concerned Don’t know
Petrol and energy prices 60% 32% 7% 1% 1%
Excessive executive salaries 54% 27% 14% 4% 1%
Affordability of housing 53% 31% 13% 2% 1%
Not enough regulation of banks 53% 27% 15% 4% 2%
Jobs going overseas 47% 33% 15% 4% 1%
Food prices and inflation generally 45% 42% 10% 2% 1%
Interest rates 44% 33% 17% 5% 1%
The age pension 37% 34% 22% 5% 1%
Not enough regulation of large corporations 36% 32% 24% 6% 2%
Improving wages for low income earners 34% 40% 20% 4% 1%
Taxation 32% 37% 26% 4% 1%
Not enough superannuation 32% 37% 23% 7% 2%
Government debt 31% 33% 26% 8% 2%
Unemployment 26% 35% 30% 8% 1%

More than half the respondents said they were very concerned about petrol and energy prices, excessive executive salaries, affordability of housing and regulation of banks.

Petrol and energy prices were of most concern to people aged 55+ (69%).

57% of those aged under 35 were very concerned about the affordability of housing.

67% of people aged 55+ were very concerned about regulation of banks and 76% were very concerned about excessive executive salaries.

Overall, there were not major differences between Labor and Liberal voters except for Government debt (Labor 16% very concerned, Liberal/National 49%). Comments »

Party Best at Handling Issues

Nov 8, 2010

Q. Between Liberal and Labor, which party do you think would be best at managing each of the following issues?

  Labor Liberal No difference Don’t know Labor-Liberal difference
Improving wages for low income earners 34% 20% 34% 13% +14
The age pension 27% 23% 37% 13% +4
Executive salaries 22% 20% 44% 14% +2
Unemployment 24% 25% 38% 13% -1
Regulation of large corporations 21% 24% 41% 14% -3
Affordability of housing 19% 24% 44% 13% -5
Jobs going overseas 18% 24% 44% 14% -6
Superannuation 18% 27% 40% 15% -9
Petrol and energy prices 16% 26% 45% 13% -10
Regulation of banks 19% 29% 39% 14% -10
Interest rates 17% 30% 41% 13% -13
Food prices and inflation generally 18% 31% 38% 13% -13
Taxation 18% 32% 37% 13% -14
Government debt 15% 42% 31% 12% -27

The only substantial lead for the Labor Party is on improving wages for low income earners (34% to 20%).

 Liberal Party strengths are in managing Government debt (42%/15%), taxation (32%/18%), food prices and inflation (31%/18%) and interest rates (30%/17%).

Although overall opinions are closely related to voting intention, the Liberal Party generally performs better among its voters than the Labor Party does with its voters. On Government debt Labor voters split 35% Labor/14% Liberal/42% no difference and on petrol and energy prices 37%/2%/50%. Comments »

Government Support for Industries

Nov 8, 2010

Q. Thinking about Australian industries and the ways in which the Government can give them assistance and support – which forms of assistance and support do you think the Government should give to the following industries? (multi-response)

  Lower tax rates Direct subsidies and grants Protection from overseas competition Total should give assistance Should not give any assistance Don’t know
Agriculture 34% 44% 45% 79% 7% 14%
Renewable energy e.g. solar panels, wind farms 34% 56% 19% 79% 7% 14%
Other manufacturing e.g. clothing, whitegoods 24% 16% 43% 69% 14% 17%
Car manufacturing 22% 18% 39% 66% 16% 18%
Mining 13% 9% 19% 37% 42% 21%
Banking and finance 13% 3% 12% 25% 57% 18%
Media e.g. newspapers, TV stations 5% 5% 12% 21% 58% 21%

More than three-quarters of respondents are in favour of Government assistance and support for agriculture and renewable energy industries. 45% believe that agriculture should receive protection from overseas competition and 56% support direct grants and subsidies for renewable energy.

About two-thirds are in favour of Government support for car and other manufacturing industries – especially protection from overseas competition.

Media (21%) and banking and finance (25%) are thought to be least deserving of Government support.

By voting intention Liberal/National voters were a little more likely to favour Government support for agriculture (87%) and mining (44%). Comments »

Difference between Labor and Liberal Parties

Nov 8, 2010

 Q. Thinking about the Federal Parliament, how much difference do you think there is between the policies of the Labor Party and the Liberal Party?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Very little difference 29% 30% 20% 51%
Some difference 43% 50% 45% 35%
A lot of difference 19% 15% 31% 4%
Don’t know 9% 5% 5% 10%

Q. Do you think that in the last few years, the policies of the Labor Party and the Liberal Party have become more similar or do you think their policies have been moving apart?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Become more similar 51% 54% 50% 63%
Moving further apart 17% 16% 23% 5%
No change 21% 23% 19% 19%
Don’t know 12% 7% 8% 13%

 Only 19% believe there is a lot of difference between the Labor and Liberal Parties and 29% think there is very little difference.  Liberal/National voters (31% a lot of difference) are more likely to think there is a difference than Labor voters (15%).  37% of those aged under 35 think there is little difference.

51% think the Labor and Liberal Parties have become more similar and 17% think they are moving further apart. When this question was last asked in September 2009, 49% said the parties had become closer and 20% further apart. Comments »

NSW – voting intention

Nov 5, 2010

 

Q. If a State Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

sample size = 1,953

First preference/leaning to  Total Election

Mar 07

Change
Liberal 47% 26.9%  
National 3% 10.1%  
Total Lib/Nat 50% 37.0% +13.0%
Labor 29% 39.0% -10.0%
Greens 11% 9.0% +2.0%
Other/Independent 10% 15.0% -5.0%

 

2PP Total Election

Mar 07

Change
Total Lib/Nat 58% 47.7% +10.3%
Labor 42% 52.3% -10.3%

 NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 6-week averages derived the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the previous election. Comments »

Victoria – voting intention

Nov 5, 2010

Q. If a State Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

sample size = 1,465

First preference/leaning to  Total Election Nov 06  Change
Liberal 42% 34.4%  
National 2% 5.2%  
Total Lib/Nat 44% 39.6% +4.4%
Labor 38% 43.1% -5.1%
Greens 12% 10.0% +2.0%
Other/Independent 6% 7.3% -1.3%
2PP Total Election Nov 06  Change
Total Lib/Nat 50% 45.6% +4.4%
Labor 50% 54.4% 4.4%

 NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 6-week averages derived the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the previous election. Comments »

Queensland – voting intention

Nov 5, 2010

Q. If a State Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

sample size = 1,138

First preference/leaning to  Total Election

Mar 09

Change
Liberal National 50% 41.6% +8.4%
Labor 29% 42.2% -13.2%
Greens 9% 8.4% +0.6%
Other/Independent 12% 7.8% +4.2%

 

2PP Total Election

Mar 07

Change
Total Lib/Nat 59% 49.1% +9.9%
Labor 41% 50.9% -9.9%

 NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 6-week averages derived the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the previous election. Comments »

Regulation is the new black

Nov 2, 2010

First Published on The Drum 02/11/2010

Joe Hockey is swanning around the airwaves like the coolest kid at school, convinced he’s discovered a new fad that’s sure to catch on. It’s called regulation and it rocks.

Of course many old hands may wonder whether all Joe has done is stumble upon a bit of retro, like some early Midnight Oil recordings, but right now Joe is stoked, he’s got a new tattoo and everyone is checking him out. Even the Greens want to play with him.

Still, if the old post-election cliche that the ‘people always get it right’ has any sort of credibility, Joe’s biggest risk is he’ll soon be overtaken by a bunch of converts who want to take the trend way more seriously than a wide-boy with a beat-box can.

As the latest Essential Report shows, there are votes to be won in regulating the bastard banks, especially in a week when Westpac is tipped to tip the Big Four’s profits over the $20 billion mark.

Comments »

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