Actions on climate change

Apr 8, 2014

Q. Which of the following actions on climate change do you most support?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Oct 13

Keeping the carbon tax

17%

27%

6%

29%

19%

15%

Replacing the carbon tax with an emissions trading scheme

22%

30%

14%

35%

19%

21%

Replacing the carbon tax with the Liberal’s “direct action” plan

12%

4%

23%

4%

13%

15%

Dumping the carbon tax and not replacing it at all

30%

19%

44%

9%

35%

31%

Don’t know

19%

20%

13%

23%

15%

18%

30% think the carbon tax should be dumped and not replaced, 22% support replacing it with an emissions trading scheme, 12% prefer the Liberal’s “direct action” plan and 17% think the Government should keep the carbon tax. These figures have changed little since this question was asked in October.

Those most likely to support keeping the tax or changing to an emissions trading scheme were Labor voters (57%) and Greens voters (64%) and those with a university education (51%).

Those most likely to think the carbon tax should be dumped and not replaced were Liberal/National voters (44%) and those who had not completed secondary education (43%). Only 23% of Liberal/National voters preferred the Liberal’s “direct action” plan (down from 28% in October).

Actions on climate change

Oct 29, 2013

Q. Which of the following actions on climate change do you most support?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Keeping the carbon tax

15%

30%

2%

44%

4%

Replacing the carbon tax with an emissions trading scheme

21%

25%

15%

35%

24%

Replacing the carbon tax with the Liberal’s “direct action” plan

15%

2%

28%

3%

19%

Dumping the carbon tax and not replacing it at all

31%

25%

41%

5%

35%

Don’t know

18%

18%

14%

14%

17%

31% think the carbon tax should be dumped and not replaced, 21% support replacing it with an emissions trading scheme, 15% prefer the Liberal’s “direct action” plan and 15% think the Government should keep the carbon tax.

Those most likely to support keeping the tax or changing to an emissions trading scheme were Labor voters (55%) and Greens voters (79%), people aged under 25 (59%) and those with a university education (45%).

Those most likely to think the carbon tax should be dumped and not replaced were Liberal/National voters (41%) and those who had no post-secondary education (42%). Only 28% of Liberal/National voters preferred the Liberal’s “direct action” plan.

Carbon pricing

Jul 23, 2013

Q. Do you support or oppose the Government’s carbon pricing scheme which was introduced in July 2012 and requires industries to pay a tax based on the amount of carbon pollution they emit?

 

7
Mar 11

14 June

19 Sep

21 Nov

25 Jun 12

2
Oct

29 Jan 13

27 May

 

Total 23 Jul

 

Vote
ALP

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total support

35%

38%

37%

38%

35%

38%

37%

43%

37%

55%

17%

75%

Total oppose

48%

49%

52%

53%

54%

48%

50%

43%

48%

30%

73%

9%

Strongly support

9%

13%

14%

14%

14%

12%

11%

15%

13%

21%

3%

35%

Support

26%

25%

23%

24%

21%

26%

26%

28%

24%

34%

14%

40%

Oppose

19%

19%

17%

17%

19%

22%

22%

20%

22%

20%

26%

8%

Strongly oppose

29%

30%

35%

36%

35%

26%

28%

23%

26%

10%

47%

1%

Don’t know

18%

13%

12%

10%

11%

14%

12%

13%

15%

15%

10%

16%

Support for carbon pricing has declined significantly since the last time the question was polled in May. Support is down six points to 37% and opposition up five points to 48%.

Looking at the results by voting intention, Labor voters (55%) and Greens voters (75%) were the most likely to support carbon pricing, whereas 73% of Coalition voters oppose it.

Labor Party policies

Jul 8, 2013

Q. Under Kevin Rudd’s leadership, do you think the Labor Party should dump, change or keep their policies on the following issues?

 

Dump

Keep

Change

Don’t know

Handling of asylum seekers

21%

10%

51%

17%

Building the NBN

14%

50%

15%

15%

The mining tax

29%

30%

24%

18%

The carbon tax

39%

25%

23%

13%

The Gonski education reforms

15%

44%

16%

25%

The NDIS

7%

59%

9%

25%

Respondents were most likely to think the Labor Party under Kevin Rudd should keep the NDIS (59%), building the NBN (50%) and the Gonski reforms (44%).

51% think it should change the policies around handling asylum seekers and 39% think it should dump the carbon tax. Opinions were divided over the mining tax – 30% keep, 29% dump and 24% change.

Labor voters were most in favour of keeping the NBN (78%), the mining tax (47%), the carbon tax (39%), the Gonski reforms (67%) and the NDIS (74%) but favoured changing the policy on asylum seekers (56%).

Government decisions

Jun 24, 2013

Q. Thinking about the decisions the Labor Government has made over the last few years, do you think the following decisions were good or bad for Australia?

 

Total good

Total bad

Very good

Good

Neither good nor bad

Bad

Very bad

Don’t know

Sep 12 good

Sep 12 bad

Expanding dental health services for people on low incomes

73%

8%

28%

45%

15%

4%

4%

5%

77%

5%

Increasing the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,200

72%

8%

34%

38%

15%

5%

3%

5%

75%

4%

Increasing the age pension

67%

14%

27%

40%

16%

10%

4%

4%

70%

11%

Protecting large areas of Australia’s marine environment in a network of marine reserves

66%

10%

27%

39%

19%

6%

4%

5%

67%

8%

Introducing the National Disability Insurance Scheme

63%

9%

26%

37%

20%

5%

4%

8%

58%

5%

Increasing superannuation from 9% to 12%

62%

14%

24%

38%

19%

10%

4%

5%

68%

9%

Stimulus spending to tackle the Global Financial Crisis (GFC)

50%

26%

21%

29%

19%

17%

9%

5%

54%

22%

Introducing a tax on large profits of mining companies

49%

27%

21%

28%

20%

15%

12%

5%

49%

25%

Building the NBN (National Broadband Network)

48%

28%

22%

26%

18%

15%

13%

6%

43%

28%

Paid parental leave

48%

22%

14%

34%

24%

13%

9%

5%

52%

20%

Spending on new school buildings during the GFC

47%

26%

12%

35%

20%

15%

11%

6%

53%

22%

Implementing the recommendations of the Gonski report to increase education funding

46%

22%

17%

29%

23%

12%

10%

9%

54%

8%

Abolished WorkChoices

42%

27%

23%

19%

22%

17%

10%

10%

42%

27%

Introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change

32%

48%

14%

18%

16%

18%

30%

4%

28%

51%

The two most popular decisions of the Labor Government are ‘expanding dental health services for people on low incomes’ (73% total good) and ‘increasing the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,000 (72% total good).  The least popular decisions were ‘Implementing the recommendations of the Gonski report (46% total good), ‘Abolished WorkChoices’ (42% total good) and ‘introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change’ (32% total good).

The only issue which received a net negative response was ‘introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change’, where 48% of respondents believed it to be bad for Australia.

Since this question was previously asked last September, perceptions of most decisions have become a little more negative – with the exceptions of the “carbon tax” which shifted from 28% to 32% ‘good’, the ‘NDIS’ which shifted from 58% to 63% ‘good’ and building the NBN which shifted from 43% to 48% ‘good’.

The largest negative shifts were for the ‘Gonski recommendations’ (down 8% to 46%), increasing super (down 6% to 62%) and spending on schools during the GFC (down 6% to 47%).

Carbon tax and mining tax

May 27, 2013

Q. In his reply to the budget Tony Abbott said he would dump the carbon tax and the mining tax but still retain the Labor Government’s compensation payments to households. If he is elected at the next election what do you think he is most likely to do?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Dump the carbon tax and mining tax and keep the compensation to households

26%

9%

47%

6%

Dump the carbon tax and mining tax but will not keep the compensation to households

29%

35%

27%

35%

He won’t dump the carbon tax and mining tax

28%

40%

14%

38%

Don’t know

17%

15%

11%

20%

Only 26% think that if Tony Abbott becomes Prime Minister at the next election, he will dump the carbon tax and the mining tax but still retain the Labor Government’s compensation payments to households. 29% think he will dump the taxes but will not keep the compensation to households and 28% think he won’t dump the taxes.

Only 47% of Liberal/National voters believe he will dump the taxes and keep the compensation.

Dumping the carbon tax and mining tax

May 27, 2013

Q. And which option would you most favour?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Dump the carbon tax and mining tax and keep the compensation to households

39%

28%

53%

16%

Dump the carbon tax and mining tax and not keep the compensation to households

20%

6%

34%

12%

Keep the carbon tax and mining tax

27%

53%

6%

62%

Don’t know

14%

13%

8%

10%

39% favour dumping the carbon tax and mining tax and keeping the compensation to households, 27% favour keeping the taxes and 20% favour dumping the taxes and not keeping the compensation.

Strongest support for keeping the mining and carbon taxes came from Labor voters (53%), Greens voters (62%) and people on incomes over $1,600pw (32%).

Strongest support for dumping the taxes and keeping the compensation came from Liberal/National voters (53%) and people on incomes less than $1,000pw (48%).

Carbon pricing

May 27, 2013

Q. Do you support or oppose the Government’s carbon pricing scheme which was introduced in July 2012 and requires industries to pay a tax based on the amount of carbon pollution they emit?

7
Mar 11

14 June

19
Sep

21 Nov

25
Jun
12

2
Oct

29
Jan
13

Total
27
May

Vote ALP

Vote Lib

Vote Greens

Total support

35%

38%

37%

38%

35%

38%

37%

43%

70%

22%

79%

Total oppose

48%

49%

52%

53%

54%

48%

50%

43%

18%

69%

12%

Strongly support

9%

13%

14%

14%

14%

12%

11%

15%

30%

4%

34%

Support

26%

25%

23%

24%

21%

26%

26%

28%

40%

18%

45%

Oppose

19%

19%

17%

17%

19%

22%

22%

20%

12%

28%

5%

Strongly oppose

29%

30%

35%

36%

35%

26%

28%

23%

6%

41%

7%

Don’t know

18%

13%

12%

10%

11%

14%

12%

13%

12%

9%

9%

Support for carbon pricing has increased significantly since the last time the question was polled in January. Support is up six points to 43% and opposition down seven points to 43%.

Looking at the results by voting intention, Labor voters (70%) and Greens voters (79%) were the most likely to support carbon pricing, whereas 69% of Coalition voters oppose it.

Younger respondents were more likely to support carbon pricing than older respondents – for those aged under 35, 52% support and 25% oppose while 56% of those aged 55+ oppose and 39% support.

Reasons Government is unpopular

Apr 8, 2013

Q. Although Australia’s economy is doing very well, according to opinion polls the Government is very unpopular. What do you think is the main reason for this? *

 

28 May 12

Total

8 Apr 13

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Voters don’t trust the Prime Minister

28%

27%

19%

35%

31%

The Labor Party is divided and can’t govern properly

na

19%

15%

23%

23%

The economy is doing well for other reasons, like China and the mining boom, not because of the government

15%

13%

9%

19%

11%

Voters would prefer Kevin Rudd as Prime Minister

na

9%

14%

4%

7%

Voters aren’t benefitting from the strong economy.

12%

9%

10%

5%

12%

The carbon tax has increased (will increase) the cost of living

17%

7%

6%

9%

-

Some other reason

8%

12%

21%

3%

12%

Don’t know

3%

5%

7%

2%

5%

* Based on those who agree the economy is good.

Respondents who thought the economy was doing well, thought the main reasons for the Government’s unpopularity were that voters don’t trust the Prime Minister (27%) and the Labor Party is divided and can’t govern properly (19%).

Both Liberal/National and Greens voters said trust in the Prime Minister was the key issue.

Since May last year, those blaming the impact of the carbon tax has declined from 17% to 7%.

Support for major Government decisions

Mar 18, 2013

Q. Do you support or oppose the following Government decisions?

 

26 Nov 12

18 Mar 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Support

Total Oppose

Total Support

Total Oppose

Strongly support

Support

Oppose

Strongly oppose

Don’t know

NBN (National Broadband Network) – high speed broadband access across Australia

69%

20%

73%

19%

35%

38%

10%

9%

8%

The Minerals Resource Rent Tax (MRRT) – a tax on large profits of mining companies

63%

22%

57%

29%

24%

33%

15%

14%

14%

The carbon pricing scheme – a tax on industries based on the amount of carbon pollution they emit

46%

44%

44%

46%

17%

27%

20%

26%

10%

The decision which has the most support amongst respondents is the NBN, with 73% in favour and only 19% opposed – an increase in support since this question was last asked in November (from net +49 to net +54).

There is majority support from respondents for the MRRT, with 57% in favour of the tax and 29% opposed. However, this represents a significant drop in support since November – from net +41 to net +28.

Support for the carbon pricing scheme has declined a little since the last time the question was polled in November. Support has decreased from 46% to 44% and opposition increased from 44% to 46% – a change from net +2 to net -2.

Support for major Government decisions

Nov 26, 2012

Q. Do you support or oppose the following Government decisions?

 

Total Support

Total Oppose

 

Strongly support

Support

Oppose

Strongly oppose

Don’t know

NBN (National Broadband Network) – high speed broadband access across Australia

69%

20%

30%

39%

11%

9%

11%

The Minerals Resource Rent Tax (MRRT) – a tax on large profits of mining companies

63%

22%

25%

38%

12%

10%

15%

The carbon pricing scheme – a tax on industries based on the amount of carbon pollution they emit

46%

44%

17%

29%

19%

25%

10%

The decision which has the most support amongst respondents is the NBN, with 69% in favour and only 20% opposed.

There is also a similar level of support from respondents for the MRRT, with 63% in favour of the tax and about a third of that amount of respondents (22%) opposed.

Support for the carbon pricing scheme has increased since the last time the question was polled on 2 October 2012.  On that occasion, 38% of respondents supported the carbon tax, whilst 48% were opposed.  The question this week, asked slightly differently in so far as being asked in the context of three Government decisions, nonetheless shows an increase in support for the carbon pricing scheme from 38% to 46% and a drop in opposition from 48% to 44%.

Respondents aged 65+ were the most likely to oppose the carbon tax (57%), the NBN (41%) and the MRRT (36%).

Respondents aged 18-24 were more likely to support the NBN (77%), as were those aged between 25-34 (79%).

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