Essential Report

Likelihood of repealing major Government decisions

Nov 26, 2012

Q. If the Liberal and National parties win the next election, do you think they will repeal any of these Government decisions?

 

Yes, probably will repeal

No, probably won’t repeal

Don’t know

The carbon pricing scheme

44%

32%

24%

NBN (National Broadband Network)

18%

54%

28%

The Minerals Resource Rent Tax (MRRT)

33%

35%

32%

A greater portion of respondents believe that a Coalition government will repeal the carbon tax (44%) than those that believe they will not repeal it (32%).

The majority of respondents believe that a Coalition government probably won’t repeal the NBN (54%).

Respondents are evenly split on whether a Coalition government will repeal the MRRT, with 33% believing they will repeal it and 35% believing they probably won’t.

Budget surplus

Nov 26, 2012

Q. In order to keep to their commitment to return to surplus in 2012-13, which measures should the Government take?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Increase taxes for big corporations

59%

70%

51%

65%

Reduce tax breaks for high income earners

46%

51%

41%

62%

Cut “middle class welfare” such as the Baby Bonus, first home buyers grant and Family Tax Benefit payments

43%

42%

48%

52%

Reduce defence spending

38%

40%

33%

70%

Postpone building the NBN

27%

18%

42%

14%

Cut spending on unemployment and disability benefits

26%

20%

36%

17%

Postpone other infrastructure projects like new roads and highways

12%

12%

13%

12%

Measures most supported by respondents in order to keep the commitment to the 2012-13 budget surplus are increasing taxes for big corporations (59%), reducing tax breaks for high income earners (46%) and cutting ‘middle class welfare’ (43%).

Looking at the results by voting intention, the majority of Lib/Nat voters support increasing taxes for big corporations (51%).  Labor voters are most in favour of increasing taxes for big corporations (70%) and reducing tax breaks for high income earners (51%).  Greens voters are most inclined to support reducing defence spending (70%) and increasing taxes for big corporations (65%).

Decisions of the Labor Government

Sep 10, 2012

Q. Thinking about the decisions the Labor Government has made over the last few years, do you think the following decisions were good or bad for Australia?

Total good

Total bad

Very good

Good

Neither good nor bad

Bad

Very bad

Don’t know

Expanding dental health services for people on low incomes

77%

5%

33%

44%

14%

2%

3%

5%

Increasing the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,200

75%

4%

36%

39%

16%

3%

1%

5%

Increasing the age pension

70%

11%

30%

40%

13%

7%

4%

6%

Increasing superannuation from 9% to 12%

68%

9%

27%

41%

16%

6%

3%

6%

Protecting large areas of Australia’s marine environment in a network of marine reserves

67%

8%

28%

39%

20%

5%

3%

7%

Introducing the National Disability Insurance Scheme

58%

5%

21%

37%

23%

3%

2%

14%

Implementing the recommendations of the Gonski report to increase education funding

54%

8%

20%

34%

25%

5%

3%

13%

Stimulus spending to tackle the Global Financial Crisis (GFC)

54%

22%

22%

32%

18%

14%

8%

8%

Spending on new school buildings during the GFC

53%

22%

15%

38%

18%

12%

10%

6%

Paid parental leave

52%

20%

17%

35%

23%

12%

8%

5%

Introducing a tax on large profits of mining companies

49%

25%

24%

25%

17%

13%

12%

8%

Implementing the recommendations of the expert committee on asylum seekers including offshore processing

45%

15%

15%

30%

28%

8%

7%

12%

Building the NBN (National Broadband Network)

43%

28%

17%

26%

22%

14%

14%

7%

Abolished WorkChoices

42%

27%

23%

19%

19%

17%

10%

12%

Introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change

28%

51%

14%

14%

15%

16%

35%

7%

The two most popular decisions of the Labor Government are ‘expanding dental health services for people on low incomes’ (77% total good) and ‘increasing the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,000 (75% total good).   The least popular decisions were ‘Building the NBN’ (43% total good), ‘Abolished WorkChoices’ (42% total good) and ‘introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change’ (28% total good).

Of the fifteen decisions put to respondents, the majority of respondents believed that 10 of the 15 decisions were good for Australia.  For the remaining 5 decisions, a larger portion of respondents generally regarded the decision to be good for Australia except for ‘introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change’, where the majority of respondents (51%) believed it to be bad for Australia.

Female respondents were more likely to endorse the dental health reforms (80% total good) compared with male respondents (74% total good).

Increasing the age pension was most strongly supported by respondents aged 65+ (77% total good).

Introducing paid parental leave was more popular with female respondents (57% total good), compared with male respondents (46% total good).  Looking at this decision by age, it was most popular amongst respondents aged 25-34 (62%) and 35-44 (62%) whereas respondents aged 65+ were the most likely to regard the decision as a bad one (36% total bad).

Implementing the recommendations of the expert committee on asylum seekers including offshore processing proved to be a very popular decision amongst respondents aged 65+ (65% total good), whereas respondents aged 25-34 were the most likely to regard it as a bad decision (43% total bad).

Female respondents were more likely to regard ‘protecting large areas of Australia’s marine environment’ as a good decision (72% total good) compared with male respondents (60% total good).

TRENDS: Do we love the NBN?

Apr 23, 2012

Peter Lewis presents polling that shows public opinion is turning in favour of the $40 billion national broadband network.


Until now the NBN has been an abstract debate about national building and future proofing the economy on one hand, and a misguided venture designed purely to waste taxpayers’ money on the other. Now it’s about to shift from rhetoric to reality, with roll out plans for about a third of households and businesses released last week.

Opinion of NBN

Apr 16, 2012

 Q. From what you’ve heard, do you favour or oppose the planned national broadband network (NBN)?

 

27 Sep 2010

14 Feb 2011

18 Apr 2011

20 Feb 2012

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total favour

56%

48%

54%

56%

57%

80%

42%

68%

Total oppose

18%

31%

28%

25%

22%

4%

40%

9%

Strongly favour

27%

19%

22%

20%

18%

31%

8%

32%

Favour

29%

29%

32%

36%

39%

49%

34%

36%

Oppose

12%

16%

13%

15%

15%

4%

26%

9%

Strongly oppose

6%

15%

15%

10%

7%

14%

Don’t know

26%

22%

18%

19%

21%

16%

18%

23%

 

Opposition to the NBN has declined a little since this question was last asked in February.

57% (+1%) favour the NBN and 22% (-3%) oppose it. There is overwhelming majority support from Labor and Greens voters and Liberal/National voters now support the NBN 42%/40%.

By age group, those aged under 35 were 63% favour/13% oppose and those aged 55+ were 53% favour/35% oppose.

79% of those that believe their area will be connected to the NBN in the next three years favour the NBN and only 12% oppose. Those who think they will not be connected in the next three years split 51% support/35% oppose.

Connection to NBN

Apr 16, 2012

 Q. The Government recently announced the areas that will be connected to the NBN over the next 3 years? As far as you know, will the area where you live be connected to the NBN in the next 3 years?


 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Yes

29%

40%

25%

27%

No

19%

13%

26%

20%

Don’t know

52%

48%

49%

53%

 

29% think their area will be connected to the NBN in the next three years – 19% think it will not be connected and 52% don’t know.

Older respondents tended to be better informed about the NBN than younger respondents. 59% of those aged under 35 said they don’t know compared to 45% of those aged 55+.

Whether Sign up for Access to NBN

Apr 16, 2012

Q. When the NBN becomes available in your area, will you sign up for internet access? 

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Definitely will

15%

22%

11%

24%

Probably will

31%

39%

24%

34%

Probably not

16%

8%

24%

7%

Definitely not

6%

1%

10%

2%

Don’t know

33%

29%

31%

34%

 

46% say they will definitely or probably sign up for internet access when the NBN becomes available in their area – 22% will probably or definitely not and 33% don’t know.

Younger respondents were only a little more likely to sign up – 48% of those aged under 35 compared to 46% of aged 35-54 and 41% of those aged 55+.

There were no major demographic differences. The main differences were by voting intention – 61% of Labor voters and 58% of Greens voters said they would definitely/probably sign up compared to only 35% of Liberal/National voters.

Measures to Return to Surplus

Apr 10, 2012

Q. In order to meet their commitment to return to surplus in 2012-13, which measures should the Government take?

Total

11/4/11

Total 10/4/12

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Increase taxes for big corporations

63%

67%

81%

55%

80%

Reduce tax breaks for high income earners

51%

57%

65%

52%

71%

Postpone major infrastructure projects like the NBN

na

41%

29%

58%

19%

Reduce defence spending

32%

38%

42%

30%

64%

Cut “middle class welfare” such as the Baby Bonus, first home buyers grant and Family Tax Benefit payments

36%

36%

37%

38%

36%

Cut spending on unemployment and disability benefits

21%

23%

18%

32%

12%

It does not need to return to surplus so quickly

38%

63%

67%

66%

58%

Overall, the most favoured means of returning the budget to surplus were increasing taxes for big corporations (67%) and reducing tax breaks for high-income earners (57%). Both these measures were strongly favoured by Labor and Greens voters.

Although support was less strong, these two measures were also two of the three the most preferred among Liberal/National voters – 58% think the Government should postpone major infrastructure projects like the NBN.

The main changes since this question was asked 12 months ago are increases in support for reducing tax breaks for high-income earners (up 6%) and reducing defence spending (up 6%).

Note, although 63% thought that the budget does not need to return to surplus so quickly, some of these respondents also agreed with some of the measures listed.

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