Essential Report

Impact of Carbon Tax

Jun 25, 2012

Q. And what impact do you expect the carbon tax to have on each of the following?

 

Increase a lot

Increase a little

Stay much the same

Decrease a little

Decrease a lot

Don’t know

Energy prices

67%

26%

4%

*

3%

Fuel prices

53%

31%

11%

1%

*

4%

Grocery prices

41%

41%

14%

1%

4%

Fresh fruit and vegetable prices

39%

39%

18%

*

*

4%

Unemployment

31%

27%

32%

2%

1%

8%

Interest rates

22%

18%

38%

8%

1%

13%

A majority expect that energy prices (67%) and fuel prices (53%) will increase a lot due to the carbon tax. 41% expect grocery prices to increase a lot and 39% expect fresh fruit and vegetable prices to increase a lot.

A majority of all demographic groups expect energy prices to increase a lot – even 48% of Labor voters agree.

Those most likely to think fuel prices will increase a lot were women (57%), aged 45-54 (60%) and Liberal/National voters (68%).

Those most likely to think grocery prices will increase a lot were aged 45+ (50%), Liberal/National voters (55%) and those on incomes under $600pw (47%). Opinions about fresh fruit and vegetable prices were similar.

58% also think that unemployment will increase and 40% think interest rates will increase because of the carbon tax.

TRENDS: Feeling the pain: fair go for Tories

Jun 4, 2012


Labor takes pride in being there for those up against hard luck. Targeted financial assistance comes in many forms, whether co-investment to an auto industry being hammered by the two-speed economy, childcare rebates to hard-up families, or the straight cash injection into middle Australian wallets.

It appears there is a new victim of the Australian economy in need of a rescue package: the Coalition voter.

With interest rates, inflation and unemployment all under the 5 per cent threshold, Australia is bucking the global trend in maintaining stability in the face of global unrest. But our polling this week shows only around one third of Australians are prepared to say the economy is performing well.

And while many are unimpressed with Australia’s performance, Coalition voters – and that’s a lot of people these days – are feeling the economic pain more intensely.

Read more on this at the Drum

Party Best at Handling Issues

Nov 8, 2010

Q. Between Liberal and Labor, which party do you think would be best at managing each of the following issues?

  Labor Liberal No difference Don’t know Labor-Liberal difference
Improving wages for low income earners 34% 20% 34% 13% +14
The age pension 27% 23% 37% 13% +4
Executive salaries 22% 20% 44% 14% +2
Unemployment 24% 25% 38% 13% -1
Regulation of large corporations 21% 24% 41% 14% -3
Affordability of housing 19% 24% 44% 13% -5
Jobs going overseas 18% 24% 44% 14% -6
Superannuation 18% 27% 40% 15% -9
Petrol and energy prices 16% 26% 45% 13% -10
Regulation of banks 19% 29% 39% 14% -10
Interest rates 17% 30% 41% 13% -13
Food prices and inflation generally 18% 31% 38% 13% -13
Taxation 18% 32% 37% 13% -14
Government debt 15% 42% 31% 12% -27

The only substantial lead for the Labor Party is on improving wages for low income earners (34% to 20%).

 Liberal Party strengths are in managing Government debt (42%/15%), taxation (32%/18%), food prices and inflation (31%/18%) and interest rates (30%/17%).

Although overall opinions are closely related to voting intention, the Liberal Party generally performs better among its voters than the Labor Party does with its voters. On Government debt Labor voters split 35% Labor/14% Liberal/42% no difference and on petrol and energy prices 37%/2%/50%. Comments »

Australia’s economy

Apr 6, 2010

Q. How important are each of the following for Australia to have a strong economy?

  Very important Somewhat important Not so important Don’t know
Low inflation 43% 42% 5% 10%
Low unemployment rate 57% 33% 3% 6%
Increased company profits 17% 46% 26% 11%
Low interest rates 38% 43% 10% 9%
A reduction in Government spending 35% 38% 19% 9%
Higher GDP 27% 41% 6% 26%
Increasing share prices 20% 40% 23% 16%
Increased wages for workers 30% 48% 15% 7%

Over half (57%) of those surveyed think that low unemployment rates is a very important for Australia to have a strong economy, 43% think low inflation is very important and 38% think low interest rates are very important. 

Labor voters were more likely to think that increased wages for workers are very important for Australia to have a strong economy (36%).  

Coalition voters were more likely to think that increased company profits (22%), a reduction in Government spending (48%) and an increasing in share prices (23%) are very important for Australia to have a strong economy. 

There were no substantial differences amongst the various demographic groups.  Comments »

Concern Regarding National Economic Issues

Nov 16, 2009

Q. How concerned are you personally about each of the following economic issues facing Australia today?

The issues that most people are very concerned about include food prices and inflation generally (55%), jobs going overseas (49%) and executive salaries (48%).   A significant number of people are very concerned about petrol and energy prices (45%) and affordability of housing (41%).

Coalition voters were more likely to be very concerned about food prices and inflation generally (60%), jobs going overseas (57%) and Government debt (54%).  Labor voters were more likely to be very concerned about executive wages (54%) and improving wages for low income earners (32%).

Females were more likely than males to be very concerned on most issues, in particular food prices and inflation generally (66% v 45%), improving wages for low income earners (34% v 22%) and unemployment (33% v 25%).

Comments »

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