Media Coverage of Political Figures Private Lives

May 31, 2010

If answered “in some circumstances” –

Q. Is it appropriate for the media to reveal details of a political figure’s private life in any of the following circumstances?

  Yes No Don’t know
Where there is a public interest due to impact on the politician’s work or taxpayers’ resources 92% 5% 3%
Where the politician has acted in a way clearly at odds with their publicly expressed views 88% 8% 4%
Where a politician’s personal choices are unusual or not considered mainstream 20% 67% 14%

Sample = 457

The majority of those who approved revealing details in some circumstances agreed that details could be revealed where there is a public interest due to impact on the politician’s work or taxpayers’ resources (92%) or where the politician has acted in a way clearly at odds with their publicly expressed views (88%). However, revealing details where a politician’s personal choices are unusual or not considered mainstream was only acceptable to 20%. Comments »

Media usage

Mar 15, 2010

Q. How frequently do you read, listen to or watch the following?

  Daily Several times a week About once a week Less often Never Don’t know
Commercial TV news and current affairs 48% 27% 12% 8% 5% 1%
News and opinion in daily newspapers 26% 22% 24% 16% 11% 1%
Commercial radio news and current affairs 24% 22% 13% 20% 19% 1%
News and opinion websites 23% 22% 17% 19% 17% 2%
ABC TV news and current affairs 19% 21% 18% 23% 18% 1%
ABC radio news and current affairs 15% 13% 10% 28% 33% 2%
Commercial radio talkback programs 13% 12% 12% 26% 36% 1%
ABC radio talkback programs 8% 10% 10% 26% 45% 2%
Internet blogs 6% 9% 13% 29% 41% 3%

 Commercial TV news and current affairs was the most used news and opinion media (48% watch daily). 26% read newspapers daily, 24% commercial radio news and current affairs and 23% news and opinion websites.

 Newspapers tend to be read more by older people (38% of 65+ years read daily). 65% of those aged 55+ watch commercial TV news and current affairs daily. Internet news and opinion websites have similar patterns of usage across age groups but internet bogs are mostly used by those aged under 35 (10% daily) Comments »

Trust in media

Mar 15, 2010

Q. How much trust do you have in what you read or hear in the following media?

  A lot Some Not much None Don’t know/use
ABC TV news and current affairs 25% 45% 14% 3% 13%
ABC radio news and current affairs 20% 42% 15% 4% 19%
Commercial TV news and current affairs 9% 55% 26% 5% 5%
News and opinion in daily newspapers 9% 53% 26% 4% 7%
Commercial radio news and current affairs 7% 47% 29% 6% 10%
ABC radio talkback programs 6% 39% 24% 5% 25%
News and opinion websites 5% 44% 31% 6% 15%
Commercial radio talkback programs 3% 35% 32% 11% 19%
Internet blogs 2% 18% 40% 15% 25%

 ABC TV and radio news and current affairs were the most trusted media (25% and 20% respectively have a lot of trust).

 Commercial TV news and current affairs programs have the highest consumption, but only 9% say they have a lot of trust in them.

And although consumption of newspapers and internet news sites is very similar, newspapers are considered more trustworthy (62% compared to 49% have a lot/some trust in them). Comments »

Politically Influential Bodies in Australia

Nov 16, 2009

Q. Which of the following do you think are the most powerful and politically influential organisations in Australia?

35% of people surveyed think that media companies (e.g. News Ltd, TV stations) are the most powerful and politically influential organisations in Australia, 22% think that the most powerful and politically influential organisations in Australia are major banks, and 10% think power is held by mining companies (e.g. BHP-Billiton).

Labor voters were more likely to think that the most influential and powerful organisations in Australia are the major banks (28%), while Coalition voters were more likely than the average to think trade unions are (16%).  Green voters were more likely to think that most power and influence is vested with mining companies (18%).

People aged 55 years and over were more likely to think that media companies are the most powerful organisations in Australia (40%), while people aged 25 – 34 were more likely to think power and influence in Australia is held by mining companies (16%).

Comments »

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