Essential Report

Federal politics – voting intention

Oct 15, 2013

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,887 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election

7 Sep 13

(current  figures)

 

4 weeks ago

19/09/13

2 weeks ago

01/10/13

Last week

8/10/13

This week

15/10/13

Liberal

 

42%

41%

40%

41%

National

2%

3%

3%

2%

Total Lib/Nat

45.5%

44%

44%

43%

43%

Labor

33.4%

37%

35%

35%

35%

Greens

8.7%

9%

9%

9%

10%

Other/Independent

12.4%

10%

12%

12%

12%

 

2 Party Preferred

Election

7 Sep 13

 

4 weeks ago

xx

2 weeks ago

xx

Last week

8/10/13

This week

15/10/13

Liberal National

53.4%

51%

53%

52%

52%

Labor

46.6%

49%

47%

48%

48%

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election.

MP pay

Oct 15, 2013

Q. A federal Member of Parliament who has no ministerial responsibility is paid about $195,000 per annum.

Do you think this is:

 

%

 

Lib/Nat voters

voters

Labor voters

Green voters

Too high

71%

66%

75%

65%

About right

27%

31%

23%

35%

Too low

2%

3%

2%

71% of people believe that the pay of federal MP’s who have no ministerial responsibilities is too high. 27% think it is about right, and 2% think it is too low.

Labor voters (75%) were more likely than Lib/Nat (66%) and Green (65%) voters to think it was too high.

Females (76%) were more likely than males (65%) to think it was too high.

 

Review of politicians entitlements

Oct 15, 2013

Q. Attorney-General George Brandis has had to repay taxpayer reimbursements he had claimed for attending the wedding of a radio announcer.

As the Attorney-General, George Brandis is responsible for a review of all politician entitlements.

The Opposition is arguing that given his own actions, he is not fit to undertake that inquiry.

 

%

 

Lib/Nat voters

 voters

Labor voters

Green voters

Attorney-General Brandis has re-paid the incorrect claim, and should be able to undertake the inquiry into politician entitlements

26%

41%

16%

8%

Attorney-General Brandis is not fit to undertake the inquiry into politician entitlements

48%

33%

61%

69%

Don’t know

27%

26%

24%

23%

Almost half (48%) of people think that Attorney-General George Brandis is not fit to undertake the inquiry into politician entitlements.

Just 26% think that as he has re-paid his incorrect claim, he should be able to undertake the inquiry.

27% don’t know.

Although Lib/Nat voters (41%) were more likely to think he should be able to undertake the inquiry (compared to just 16% of Labor voters and 8% of Greens voters), 33% still thought he is not fit to undertake the inquiry.

Party trusted to handle another GFC

Oct 15, 2013

Q. The shutdown of the US Government has sparked fears of another global recession.

If there was another Global Financial Crisis, which party would you trust most to deal with it?

 

%

 

Lib/Nat voters

Labor voters

Green voters

 

15 Aug 2011

7 May 2012

29 Jan 2103

The Liberal Party

38%

78%

6%

5%

40%

42%

40%

The Labor Party

29%

4%

68%

39%

31%

25%

26%

No Difference

23%

13%

16%

47%

20%

23%

22%

Don’t know

10%

5%

9%

9%

9%

10%

11%

If there was another GFC, 38% of people would trust the Liberal Party most to deal with it. 29% trusted Labor while 23% said there was no difference.

Trust generally followed party lines, with 78% of Lib/Nat voters selecting the Liberals and 68% of Labor voters selecting Labor. 47% of Green voters selected ‘no difference’.

The overall figures are generally in line with those from 2011, 2012 and early in 2013.

Lobbyist register

Oct 15, 2013

Q. Currently the only requirement for lobbying politicians in Australia is that professional lobbyists must register if they intend to lobby ministers or senior public servants.

Would you support the following reforms:

 

Total

Support

Total

Oppose

Strongly support

Support

Oppose

Strongly oppose

Don’t know

extending the Lobbyist Register to all MPs, not just ministers

54%

8%

24%

30%

6%

2%

37%

requiring ministers and shadow ministers to publicly reveal everyone they meet other than constituents 

56%

10%

23%

33%

8%

2%

34%

banning former ministers and senior officials from lobbying in their former portfolio area for 5 years

51%

9%

22%

29%

8%

1%

39%

The majority of people support each of the reforms listed. The highest level of support was for ministers and shadow ministers to publicly reveal everyone they meet other than constituents (56%).

There were very low levels of opposition to each of these reforms, but a significant proportion of people selected don’t know (between 34-39% for each reform).

There were no significant differences in the level of support for these reforms based on voting intention.

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