Forms of intolerance

Mar 3, 2015

Q. For each of the following forms of intolerance, please indicate to what extent you think it is a problem in Australia. 

 

Total large/ mod

 

A large problem

Mod problem

Small

problem

Not a problem at all

Don’t know

 

Sept 12

Total large/ mod

Jun 13

Total large/ mod

Feb 14

Total large/ mod

Racism

67%

30%

37%

23%

6%

4%

71%

69%

64%

Religious intolerance

61%

28%

33%

25%

9%

5%

65%

54%

51%

Sexism

47%

16%

31%

36%

12%

5%

45%

52%

51%

Ageism

45%

17%

28%

33%

13%

9%

44%

46%

49%

Homo-phobia

45%

15%

30%

32%

15%

8%

50%

51%

47%

67% think that racism is a major/moderate problem in Australia – up 3% compared to when this question was previously asked in February last year. 61% think that religious intolerance is a major/moderate problem – up 10% since last February.

Those most likely to think racism a major/moderate problem were women (73%) and Greens voters (80%).

Those most likely to think religious intolerance a major/moderate problem were women (73%) and incomes under $600pw (69%).

Those most likely to think sexism a major/moderate problem were women (68%) and Greens voters (67%).

Those most likely to think homophobia a major/moderate problem were Greens voters (67%), Labor voters (53%) and aged 18-24 (57%).

58% of those aged 55+ think ageism is a major/moderate problem.

Experience of forms of intolerance

Mar 3, 2015

Q. Have you personally experienced or witnessed any of the following forms of intolerance in the past 12 months? 

 

Total

 

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

 

Total Jun 13

Total Feb 14

Racism

33%

35%

32%

45%

32%

21%

39%

36%

Sexism

26%

21%

32%

32%

25%

20%

29%

29%

Religious intolerance

26%

25%

27%

36%

24%

17%

29%

28%

Ageism

22%

21%

24%

20%

18%

32%

24%

26%

Homophobia

19%

18%

20%

27%

17%

12%

26%

24%

 

33% say they have experienced or witnessed racism in the past 12 months, while about one quarter have experienced or witnessed sexism and religious intolerance. These figures have dropped a little since this question was last asked in February last year.

Younger people (aged 18-34) were more likely to have experienced/witnessed racism (45%), homophobia (27%), sexism (32%) and religious intolerance (36%). 32% of those aged 55+ say they have experienced/witnessed ageism. 32% of women say they have experienced/witnessed sexism.

Human Rights Commission

Mar 3, 2015

Q. The Federal government says it has lost confidence in the Commonwealth Human Rights Commission and its president Gillian Triggs after it released a report on children in immigration detention. Do you approve or disapprove of the performance of the Human Rights Commission? 

 

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Total approve

34%

46%

26%

60%

30%

Total disapprove

22%

15%

34%

9%

28%

Strongly approve

13%

20%

5%

36%

9%

Approve

21%

26%

21%

24%

21%

Disapprove

13%

11%

18%

6%

13%

Strongly disapprove

9%

4%

16%

3%

15%

Don’t know

44%

39%

41%

32%

42%

 

34% approve of the performance of the Human Rights Commission and 22% disapprove. 44% had no opinion.

Those most likely to approve were Greens voters (60%), Labor voters (46%) and university-educated (40%).

Federal politics – voting intention

Feb 24, 2015

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to? 

Sample size = 1,836 respondents 

First preference/leaning to

Election

7 Sep 13

 

4 weeks ago

27/1/15

2 weeks ago 10/2/15

Last week

17/2/15

This week 24/2/15

Liberal

 

36%

36%

36%

38%

National

3%

3%

3%

3%

Total Liberal/National

45.6%

39%

39%

39%

40%

Labor

33.4%

41%

41%

41%

41%

Greens

8.6%

9%

10%

10%

9%

Palmer United Party

5.5%

2%

3%

2%

2%

Other/Independent

6.9%

9%

8%

8%

8%

 

2 Party Preferred

Election

7 Sep 13

 

4 weeks ago

27/1/15

2 weeks ago 10/2/15

Last week

17/2/15

This week 24/2/15

Liberal National

53.5%

46%

46%

46%

47%

Labor

46.5%

54%

54%

54%

53%

NB. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2013 election.

Management of the economy

Feb 24, 2015

Q. How would you rate the government’s management of the Australian economy compared to how governments in other countries around the world have managed their economies? 

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

May 2013

May 2014

Oct 2014

Total good

34%

20%

59%

26%

22%

39%

40%

39%

Total poor

30%

46%

9%

45%

39%

32%

31%

28%

Very good

7%

5%

14%

-

4%

11%

9%

11%

Good

27%

15%

45%

26%

18%

28%

31%

28%

Neither good nor poor

31%

30%

31%

27%

32%

24%

24%

28%

Poor

16%

24%

7%

25%

22%

17%

14%

15%

Very poor

14%

22%

2%

20%

17%

15%

17%

13%

Don’t know

5%

5%

1%

3%

7%

5%

5%

5%

34% of Australians rate the government’s management of the economy, compared to other countries around the world, as good.

30% rate their management of the economy as poor.

This represents a net decline from +11 to +4 since October.

Labor (20%), Greens (26%) and other (22%) voters were less likely to rate the government’s management of the economy as ‘good’. Liberal/National voters (59%) were more likely to rate the government’s management of the economy as ‘good’ – although this has dropped from 68% in October.

40% of those earning $1,600+ pw rate the government’s management ‘good’ and 44% of those earning less than $600 pw rate it ‘poor’.

Concern about economic issues

Feb 24, 2015

Q. How concerned are you personally about the following economic issues? 

 

Very concerned

Somewhat concerned

Not so concerned

Not at all concerned

Don’t know

 

Very concerned Oct 2014

Change

Cost of electricity and gas

47%

38%

12%

2%

2%

57%

-10

Housing affordability

39%

35%

18%

6%

2%

40%

-1

Cost of food and groceries

35%

43%

18%

3%

2%

45%

-10

Unemployment

30%

41%

22%

4%

2%

31%

-1

Wealth disparity

30%

35%

23%

7%

6%

33%

-3

Job security

29%

37%

22%

9%

3%

35%

-6

National debt

27%

39%

24%

7%

3%

21%

+6

The current budget deficit

27%

37%

25%

7%

5%

21%

+6

Cost of petrol

24%

40%

26%

7%

2%

49%

-25

Value of the Australian dollar

24%

39%

28%

7%

3%

22%

+2

Tax levels

24%

38%

29%

6%

3%

28%

-4

Interest rates

19%

32%

32%

14%

3%

25%

-6

Economic issues of most concern were cost of electricity/gas (47% very concerned), housing affordability (39%) and cost of food and groceries (35%).

Since October there have been substantial declines in concern about cost of petrol (down 25%), cost of electricity and gas (down 10%) and cost of food and groceries (down 10%).

Women were more concerned than men about cost of food and groceries (42% vs 29% very concerned), cost of electricity/gas (52% vs 41%) and housing affordability (43% vs 34%).

Job security

Feb 24, 2015

Q. In the next two years, do you expect your job to be more secure, less secure or about the same?

 

Total

 

Work full time

Work part time

Income less than $1,000 pw

Income $1,000-$1,600 pw

Income $1,600+ pw

 

Oct 2014

Total more secure

9%

16%

7%

13%

10%

9%

14%

Total less secure

29%

33%

30%

37%

26%

28%

31%

Much more secure

3%

3%

4%

3%

5%

3%

5%

Somewhat more secure

6%

5%

7%

10%

5%

6%

9%

About the same

58%

59%

55%

44%

59%

61%

50%

Somewhat less secure

17%

18%

15%

22%

14%

18%

17%

Much less secure

12%

11%

13%

15%

12%

10%

14%

Don’t know

4%

4%

5%

6%

4%

2%

4%

(Based on working people : n = 616)

9% (down 5%) of workers expect their job to be more secure in the next two years and 29% (down 2%) think it will be less secure – 58% (up 8%) think it will be about the same.

Those on lower incomes were more likely to think their job would be less secure.

Importance of international relationships

Feb 24, 2015

Q. How important is it for Australia to have a close relationship with the following nations?

 

Very import-ant

Quite import-ant

Not very import-ant

Don’t know

 

Very Import-ant

Mar 11

Very Import-ant

Nov 13

Very Import-ant

Jun 14

Very Import-ant

Oct 14

Change

United States

44%

40%

7%

8%

60%

59%

57%

53%

-9

China

41%

41%

8%

9%

48%

54%

46%

44%

-3

United Kingdom

38%

41%

12%

9%

56%

48%

48%

48%

-10

Japan

30%

50%

9%

11%

39%

35%

32%

31%

-1

Indonesia

22%

44%

23%

11%

31%

40%

35%

32%

-10

Canada

22%

43%

23%

12%

na

na

28%

26%

-4

India

20%

47%

21%

12%

26%

26%

23%

22%

-2

Germany

18%

43%

26%

13%

23%

20%

21%

22%

-4

Saudi Arabia

12%

39%

35%

14%

na

na

na

17%

-5

Russia

11%

33%

43%

13%

na

na

na

16%

-5

44% of respondents think it is very important to have a close relationship with the United States and 41% think it is very important to have a close relationship with China. Relations with Russia (11%) and Saudi Arabia (12%) were thought to be the least important.

A close relationship with the United States is considered very important by 50% of Liberal/National voters, 47% of Labor voters and 36% of Greens voters.

Since this question was asked in October, there has been a decrease in the rating of the importance of relations for all countries – especially United Kingdom and Indonesia (both down 10%).

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