Search results for "trust in media"
Apr 21, 2020
Essential Research

Information about Covid-19

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the information you’ve received about the Covid-19 outbreak?

NET: Agree 20/04 13/04 06/04 29/03 22/03
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 66% 71% 70% 63% 64%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 62% 65% 63% 56% 56%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 55% 58% 52% 47% 51%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 41% 42% 51% 42% 35%
Base (n) 1,051 1,068 1,069 1,086 1,034

 

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 66% 15% 23% 43% 19% 11% 4%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 62% 19% 23% 39% 19% 12% 7%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 55% 26% 18% 37% 19% 18% 8%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 41% 32% 8% 33% 26% 20% 12%
Apr 14, 2020
Essential Research

Information about Covid-19

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the information you’ve received about the Covid-19 outbreak?

NET: Agree 13/04 06/04 29/03 22/03
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 71% 70% 63% 64%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 65% 63% 56% 56%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 58% 52% 47% 51%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 42% 51% 42% 35%
Base (n) 1,068 1,069 1,086 1,034

 

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 71% 13% 24% 47% 16% 8% 4%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 65% 17% 24% 41% 18% 11% 6%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 58% 21% 19% 39% 21% 14% 6%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 42% 31% 12% 30% 27% 20% 11%
Apr 7, 2020
Essential Research

Information about Covid-19

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the information you’ve received about the Covid-19 outbreak?

NET: Agree 06/04 29/03 22/03
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 70% 63% 64%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 63% 56% 56%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 52% 47% 51%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 51% 42% 35%
Base (n) 1,069 1,086 1,034

 

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 70% 14% 27% 43% 17% 9% 5%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 63% 18% 26% 37% 19% 10% 8%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 52% 26% 17% 34% 22% 19% 7%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 51% 26% 14% 37% 23% 16% 10%

 

NET: AGREE   Gender Age Group Location
Total Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Capital Non-Capital
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 70% 66% 74% 56% 68% 78% 69% 71%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 63% 59% 66% 51% 60% 70% 63% 63%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 52% 49% 55% 42% 46% 60% 51% 52%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 51% 50% 52% 41% 49% 56% 52% 49%
Base (n) 1,069 523 546 341 342 386 731 338
  • This week, woman are more likely to agree that they feel informed of the situation and the impact on them and their families (74% up from 62%), that they trust the government to provide honest and objective information (66%, up from 56%) and trust the media (52%, up from 41%). Men’s agreement that they have trust in the media has also increased from 42% to 50%.
  • People living in regional areas have higher agreement in all four statements this week – ‘I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family’ (63% to 71%), ‘I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak’ (53% to 63%), ‘The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent’ (43% to 52%) and ‘I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak (38% to 49%).
  • There has been increased agreement among those aged 35-54 that they feel informed (59% to 68%) and have trust in the information from government (49% to 60%).
  • Older people (aged over 55) and those in capital cities are more likely to agree that they trust the information in media this week (42% to 56% and 43% to 52% respectively).
Mar 31, 2020
Essential Research

Information about Covid-19

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the information you’ve received about the Covid-19 outbreak?

NET: Agree 29/03 22/03
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 63% 64%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 56% 56%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 47% 51%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 42% 35%
Base (n) 1,086 1,034

 

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 63% 17% 6% 11% 20% 44% 19%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 56% 22% 8% 14% 23% 37% 19%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 47% 30% 10% 20% 23% 32% 15%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 42% 33% 14% 19% 26% 32% 10%
Mar 24, 2020
Essential Research

Information about Covid-19

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the information you’ve received about the Covid-19 outbreak?

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 64% 14% 18% 46% 22% 9% 5%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 56% 20% 19% 37% 24% 12% 8%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 51% 24% 15% 37% 25% 17% 7%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 35% 40% 7% 27% 26% 23% 17%
  • Around two-thirds of people agree that they feel informed about the situation (64%) and over half (56%) trust the government to provide honest and objective information about the outbreak.
  • Half think the information they’ve received has been clear and consistent (51%).
  • Those who think the threat of Covid-19 has been under-estimated are more likely to disagree that they feel informed of the situation (22%), that the information they’ve receive is clear and consistent (33%) and they trust the government to deliver honest and objective information (34%).
    Gender Age Group Location
NET: AGREE Total Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Capital Non-Capital
I feel informed about the situation and the impact on me and my family 64% 63% 65% 58% 59% 73% 65% 61%
I trust the Government to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 56% 57% 54% 48% 51% 66% 57% 53%
The information I’ve received has been clear and consistent 51% 53% 50% 49% 47% 58% 54% 47%
I trust the media to provide honest and objective information about the Covid-19 outbreak 35% 38% 32% 31% 35% 37% 36% 32%
Base (n) 1,034 519 515 342 327 365 703 331
  • Those aged over 55 are more likely to agree that they feel informed about the situation (73%), that they have trust in the information from the government (66%) and that the information they’ve received has been clear and concise (58%).
  • People in non-capital areas are less likely to agree that the information they have received has been clear and consistent (47%) compared to those in capital cities (54%).
Jan 21, 2014
Essential Research

Better or worse under Liberal/National Government

Q. Under the new Liberal/National Government, do you expect the following will get better or worse?

Total
better

Total worse

Net

A
lot better

A little better

Stay much the same

A little wor-
se

A
lot wor-
se

Don’t know

Better
Sept 13

Wor
-se
Sept 13

Political leadership

33%

38%

-5

15%

18%

25%

12%

26%

3%

42%

31%

Trust in Government

30%

43%

-13

12%

18%

26%

13%

30%

3%

36%

36%

Unemployment

22%

45%

-23

6%

16%

30%

21%

24%

3%

27%

37%

The economy overall

30%

38%

-8

10%

20%

29%

21%

17%

3%

38%

30%

The cost of living

17%

52%

-35

5%

12%

29%

25%

27%

3%

27%

40%

Interest rates

16%

33%

-17

5%

11%

47%

18%

15%

4%

17%

31%

Health services

18%

45%

-27

5%

13%

35%

18%

27%

3%

23%

42%

Job security

17%

49%

-32

5%

12%

32%

21%

28%

3%

22%

43%

Workers rights and conditions

14%

45%

-31

5%

9%

36%

14%

31%

4%

18%

47%

Company profits

40%

18%

+22

13%

27%

38%

8%

10%

4%

47%

14%

The environment

16%

41%

-25

5%

11%

39%

14%

27%

4%

18%

39%

Education and schools

20%

43%

-23

6%

14%

33%

19%

24%

3%

25%

41%

Public services

17%

46%

-29

6%

11%

35%

20%

26%

3%

20%

45%

Benefits for people on Government support – such as pensioners and the unemployed

13%

49%

-36

4%

9%

35%

21%

28%

3%

19%

44%

Your personal financial situation

18%

37%

-19

5%

13%

42%

20%

17%

2%

22%

35%

Except for company profits, respondents believed all issues measured would get worse under the new Liberal/National Government. Expectations on each issue have declined since this question was asked immediately after the election. The largest declines have been for cost of living (net score down 22), the economy overall (-16), political leadership (-16), unemployment (-13) and trust in Government (-13).

Jun 27, 2012
Essential Research

Tries Lies: More Carbon Porkies to Come

First published on The Drum 26 June 2012

The ‘lie’ at the heart of Labor’s carbon tax has assumed legendary status. Never mind that the realities of the supposed falsehood are highly contestable – Labor’s carbon pricing scheme is arguably not a tax at all – “there will be no carbon tax under the government I lead” has become the iconic political lie of our times.

Its ruthlessly successful exploitation by the Abbott Opposition has spawned a political craze in exposing opponents’ lies, in the hope of replicating this highly successful case study in trust-related brand damage.

But what about the Opposition’s penchant for stretching the truth on impacts of the carbon tax?

George Brandis’s assertion the carbon tax was responsible for 1900 job cuts at Fairfax was a cracker, but only a natural extension of years of dubious claims the carbon tax would wipe towns off the map, spark mass shut-downs of industry and send families to the wall under crippling power prices.

With not much else to look forward to, Labor hopes the sun rising on July 1 – towns and families intact – will expose the Opposition’s spurious rhetoric about the carbon tax. Who is calling us liars now, you liars?

The collapse in trust in politics as we’ve reported on before, is a defining feature of our current political culture, driven largely by the kind of negative politics that have characterised the carbon debate.

In this environment, Labor has been unable to win back support for its carbon pricing scheme, with support levels on the eve of its introduction at the same low level they were towards the start of last year.

Q. Do you support or oppose the Government’s carbon pricing scheme which, from July 2012, will require industries to pay a tax based on the amount of carbon pollution they emit?

 

7 Mar 2011

23 May

1 Aug

21 Nov

Total

25 Jun 2012

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total support

35%

41%

39%

38%

35%

67%

13%

74%

Total oppose

48%

44%

51%

53%

54%

21%

81%

21%

Strongly support

9%

14%

15%

14%

14%

28%

4%

38%

Support

26%

27%

24%

24%

21%

39%

9%

36%

Oppose

19%

15%

19%

17%

19%

12%

24%

13%

Strongly oppose

29%

29%

32%

36%

35%

9%

57%

8%

Don’t know

18%

15%

10%

10%

11%

12%

7%

6%

 

If there’s a positive for Labor there, it’s that it has been able to win the support of its base on this issue, with two-thirds of Labor voters (admittedly a small pool – link to table) supporting the policy.

But despite Labor’s focus on selling the compensation elements of the carbon pricing reform, the public has bought the cost-of-living scare, with 71% believing their cost of living will increase moderately or a lot. A further 20% thought there would be a small increase and just 2% thought there would be no impact. Power, petrol, groceries and fruit and veg – people are expecting the introduction of the carbon tax to be a disaster for their hip pockets.

Q. And what impact do you expect the carbon tax to have on each of the following?

 

 

Increase a lot

Increase a little

Stay much the same

Decrease a little

Decrease a lot

Don’t know

Energy prices

67%

26%

4%

*

3%

Fuel prices

53%

31%

11%

1%

*

4%

Grocery prices

41%

41%

14%

1%

4%

Fresh fruit and vegetable prices

39%

39%

18%

*

*

4%

Unemployment

31%

27%

32%

2%

1%

8%

Interest rates

22%

18%

38%

8%

1%

13%

And herein lies the risk for Tony Abbott.

With the happy bonus that most of us aren’t really too sure what the carbon tax actually is, we can expect plenty more Brandis-style water-muddying as the carbon tax is blamed for job losses, power price rises, divorces and bad haircuts caused by completely unrelated factors.

But what if the Opposition can’t deliver carbon tax Armageddon? What if people accept that any moderate increases in prices have been offset by the one-off ‘cashforyou’ payments and associated support packages? Or, and this may be stretching it, what if the media starts questioning come of the tenuous links between price rises and carbon that the Opposition attempts to exploit?

If the world doesn’t end on Sunday, will people shift their opinion of the Carbon Tax or, worse still for Abbott, start to wonder whether they have been played for fools? Already the rhetoric is shifting from ‘death strike’ to ‘python’s grip’ but is this sustainable as a basis for the daily high-vis vest photo opp that has become the Oppostion’s modus operandi.

Another potential porky lies in the Opposition Leader’s promise to repeal the carbon tax.Abbott has pledged ‘in blood’ there would be no carbon tax under the government he leads.

Currently, we’re fairly evenly split on whether a pledge in blood is actually a core promise, with a slight majority believing he’ll go through with it.

Q. If they won the next election, how likely do you think it would be that Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party would repeal the carbon tax?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total likely

44%

28%

64%

42%

Total unlikely

40%

62%

22%

41%

Don’t know

17%

11%

14%

17%

 

But what if he can’t get the numbers through the Senate? What if he is forced to negotiate and, God forbid compromise, with those holding the balance of power? Will this be a case of a politician dealing with the hand they are dealt or just another example that all politicians lie?

While it’s easy to dismiss the dealing in truth and lies as business as usual politics, but in turning it into a Weapon of Mass Destruction it will be interesting to see if the Opposition leader has not set set his own future government onto a path of Mutually Assured Destruction.

 

 

Mar 5, 2012
Essential Research

Creating a Climate for Change on Carbon

All this fighting and cussing in Canberra has at least silenced the elephant in the Lodge, that $28 per tonne price on carbon.

It seems weeks since Tony Abbott strapped on a reflective vest and imposed himself on a Queanbeyan lunch room, but it’s only months until the price takes affect.

At this point one of two things happens – the sky falls in and Abbott blames the carbon tax or the sky doesn’t fall in and Abbott blames the carbon tax.

So as Julia Gillard prepares to strap on the safety helmet and assume (resume?) the position, here are a few clues from the polling to help her though the difficult times ahead.

1. Never again call the Carbon Price a Tax – It’s not and your concession that a price on carbon as part of the transition to an Emissions Trading Scheme was one of the most spectacular own goals in recent political history. Language does matter.

2. Take it Back to the Science – our polling shows that the biggest single determinant on supporting action on climate change is not party affiliation, age or gender but belief in the reality of climate change. The ability of the denial movement to cloud the science on climate change was decisive. Once the facts were clouded science never really had a chance, being a discipline based on scepticism as it is. Giving science a voice and then finding a forum to spread its word may be too important to trust to the media.

3. Tell the whole Story – support for a carbon price shifts from majority opposition to majority support if the question changes from support for a price on carbon, to include the compensation and investment in renewables that are part of the package. Getting the airtime to get the whole sentence out is vital to selling the measure.

4. Focus on the Car not the Carburettor – the great myth about the carbon price is that the public went from supporters to opponents in one fell swoop of Abbott vitriol. The reality is that the decline in support was first based on confusion as the Rudd-Wong dream team (and we’re talking sleep here) got obsessed with the detail of the CPRS. After 12 months of technical debate most had lost interest and drifted into indifference and confusion. From there they were easy pickings for a scare campaign.

5. Remember the best response to a scare campaign is a scare campaign – Running the high road of caring about future generations will never trump fear and loathing. Better point out as the most carbon-exposed economy in the developed world there are huge economic dangers if we sit back and wait for others to act. Get the markets scared, there is nothing rational about denial.

6. Remember this is the great moral challenge of our times – on this K Rudd was K Rect; it was the backflip that killed him. Dealing with the challenges of climate change is why we entrust our nations to governments – we expert them to make tough decisions in our long-term interests, even if we don’t always like the medicine.

7. And finally, stop pretending you didn’t do something that was brave and right – Like taxing our natural resources, building a national broadband network and giving the disabled a better deal. These are the anchor points of a Labor Government to be proud of. If only it would let us.

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