Search results for "party best"
Oct 16, 2012
Essential Research

Abbott vs Gillard

 

Tony Abbott

Julia
Gillard

 

Has the right temperament to be Prime Minister

42%

58%

Has the right temperament to be Prime Minister
Would be embarrassing as Prime Minister of Australia

50%

43%

Is embarrassing as Prime Minister of Australia
Is someone that can effectively represent Australia’s interests

43%

46%

Is someone that can effectively represent Australia’s interests
Will serve my interests as Prime Minister

39%

36%

Serves my interests as Prime Minister
Is too influenced by their religious beliefs

40%

16%

Is too influenced by their religious beliefs
Is the best person to lead their party

33%

36%

Is the best person to lead their party
Is someone that understands the challenges facing Australian women

39%

62%

Is someone that understands the challenges facing Australian women
Has good parental leave policies

44%

53%

Has good parental leave policies
Has difficulty controlling their aggression

44%

25%

Has difficulty controlling their aggression

The major perceived differences between the Prime Minister Julia Gillard and the Opposition Leader Tony Abbott were that Julia Gillard was more likely to be someone that “understands the challenges facing Australian women” (+23%), “has the right temperament to be Prime Minister” (+16%) and has “good parental leave policies” (+9%).

Tony Abbott was more likely to be associated with “too influenced by their religious beliefs” (+24%), “has difficulty controlling their aggression” (+19%) and “would be embarrassing as Prime Minister of Australia” (+7%).

Mar 5, 2012
Essential Research

Creating a Climate for Change on Carbon

All this fighting and cussing in Canberra has at least silenced the elephant in the Lodge, that $28 per tonne price on carbon.

It seems weeks since Tony Abbott strapped on a reflective vest and imposed himself on a Queanbeyan lunch room, but it’s only months until the price takes affect.

At this point one of two things happens – the sky falls in and Abbott blames the carbon tax or the sky doesn’t fall in and Abbott blames the carbon tax.

So as Julia Gillard prepares to strap on the safety helmet and assume (resume?) the position, here are a few clues from the polling to help her though the difficult times ahead.

1. Never again call the Carbon Price a Tax – It’s not and your concession that a price on carbon as part of the transition to an Emissions Trading Scheme was one of the most spectacular own goals in recent political history. Language does matter.

2. Take it Back to the Science – our polling shows that the biggest single determinant on supporting action on climate change is not party affiliation, age or gender but belief in the reality of climate change. The ability of the denial movement to cloud the science on climate change was decisive. Once the facts were clouded science never really had a chance, being a discipline based on scepticism as it is. Giving science a voice and then finding a forum to spread its word may be too important to trust to the media.

3. Tell the whole Story – support for a carbon price shifts from majority opposition to majority support if the question changes from support for a price on carbon, to include the compensation and investment in renewables that are part of the package. Getting the airtime to get the whole sentence out is vital to selling the measure.

4. Focus on the Car not the Carburettor – the great myth about the carbon price is that the public went from supporters to opponents in one fell swoop of Abbott vitriol. The reality is that the decline in support was first based on confusion as the Rudd-Wong dream team (and we’re talking sleep here) got obsessed with the detail of the CPRS. After 12 months of technical debate most had lost interest and drifted into indifference and confusion. From there they were easy pickings for a scare campaign.

5. Remember the best response to a scare campaign is a scare campaign – Running the high road of caring about future generations will never trump fear and loathing. Better point out as the most carbon-exposed economy in the developed world there are huge economic dangers if we sit back and wait for others to act. Get the markets scared, there is nothing rational about denial.

6. Remember this is the great moral challenge of our times – on this K Rudd was K Rect; it was the backflip that killed him. Dealing with the challenges of climate change is why we entrust our nations to governments – we expert them to make tough decisions in our long-term interests, even if we don’t always like the medicine.

7. And finally, stop pretending you didn’t do something that was brave and right – Like taxing our natural resources, building a national broadband network and giving the disabled a better deal. These are the anchor points of a Labor Government to be proud of. If only it would let us.

May 30, 2011
Essential Research

Interests Represented by Parties

Q. Which political party do you think best represents the interests of –

Labor Liberal Greens Don’t know
Families with young children 34% 31% 5% 29%
Students 30% 28% 10% 33%
Working people on average incomes 40% 32% 5% 23%
Working people on low incomes 43% 27% 6% 24%
Working people on high incomes 13% 63% 2% 22%
People on welfare 38% 23% 8% 30%
Pensioners 33% 28% 5% 34%
Small businesses and self-employed 20% 47% 4% 29%
Big business 13% 62% 2% 23%
The next generation of Australians 19% 31% 17% 33%
Indigenous people 23% 21% 16% 40%
Ethnic communities 22% 21% 15% 42%
Rural and regional Australians 18% 34% 11% 36%

The Labor Party is considered the party which best represents the interests of working people on low and average incomes, people on welfare and pensioners. The Liberal Party is considered best at representing the interests of people on high incomes, big business, small business and self-employed, rural and regional Australians and the next generation. The Greens’ main strengths are in representing the next generation, indigenous people and ethnic communities.

There was little difference between the major parties in terms of representing the interests of families with young children, students, indigenous people and ethnic communities.

(more…)

Feb 7, 2011
Essential Research

Flood Response – Parties

Q. Who do you think has the best approach to funding the damage from the recent floods across Australia?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Julia Gillard and the Labor Party 36% 79% 4% 55%
Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party 28% 3% 60% 8%
Don’t know 36% 19% 36% 37%

Q. Who would you trust most to manage the program of rebuilding infrastructure after the recent floods across Australia?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Julia Gillard and the Labor Party 36% 78% 3% 63%
Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party 35% 5% 75% 6%
Don’t know 29% 17% 22% 31%

Overall, respondents tend to favour the approach of Julia Gillard in funding the flood damage – 36% prefer the Labor Party approach, 28% the Liberal party and 36% don’t know.

However, in terms of managing the rebuilding of infrastructure, 36% favour Julia Gillard and the Labor Party and 35% favour Tony Abbott and the Liberal party.

(more…)

Nov 9, 2010
Essential Research

The fight for the kitchen table

First Published on The Drum 09/11/2010

Nations may rise and fall by the sweep of history but governments are decided at the kitchen table, where all politics becomes not just local, but personal.

This is the place where bills and mortgage payments are pored over, family budgets are scrutinised, jobs and school are discussed. It is the space in family life where things have to add up.

Anyone trying to dig Labor out of its current hole could start by turning their attention to the kitchen table, because if this week’s Essential Report is anything to go by, Labor is in the middle of an increasingly messy food-fight.
(more…)

Oct 14, 2010
Essential Research

It’s not too late to change the basis of voter choice

EMC’s consulting pollster Vic Fingerhut has penned this memo to Democrats in the lead-up to Congressional elections. His words of wisdom ring true here too.

***
Despite the feel good messages from the Democratic campaign committees, if messaging frames and context of voter choice on election day remain as they are today, we are heading for disaster.

Two weeks ago, I sent you a memo underlining the fact that while our opponents have a simple and clear frame for the short-term issues in the current election, we have had none.

And despite the millions spent on our side…nothing has changed.

(more…)

Aug 16, 2010
Essential Research

Handling another GFC

Q. If another global financial crisis develops in the next few years, which leader and party do you think would be best to handle it?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Julia Gillard and the Labor Party 42% 88% 5% 66%
Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party 35% 2% 80% 6%
Don’t know 23% 11% 15% 27%

42% think Julia Gillard and the Labor Party would be best at handling another global financial crisis if it was to develop and 35% think Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party would be best.

Those aged 25-54 prefer the Labor Party over the Liberals 46% to 30%, while those aged 55+ prefer the Liberal Party 48% to 36%. (more…)

Aug 2, 2010
Essential Research

The Senate

Q. Regardless of which party is elected to Government (i.e. has a majority in the House of Representatives), which of the following Senate options do you think would be best for Australia?

  Total Vote Labor Vote Liberal/ National Vote Greens
The Government has a majority in the Senate 29% 41% 33% 5%
The Opposition party has a majority in the Senate 10% 3% 21% 2%
The Greens and the independents (like Xenophon and Fielding) together hold the balance of power in the Senate 27% 25% 27% 35%
The Greens hold the balance of power in the Senate 12% 14% 3% 50%
Don’t know 22% 18% 16% 7%

 Opinions about the balance of power in the Senate are mixed. 29% prefer the Government to have a majority and 27% prefer the Greens and independents combined to hold the balance of power. Only 12% want the Greens on their own to hold the balance of power and 10% would prefer the opposition to have a majority. Overall, 39% want one of the major parties to have a majority and 39% want minor parties to hold the balance of power.

 85% of Greens voters want the Greens or Greens and independents to hold the balance of power compared to 39% of Labor voters and 30% of Liberal/National voters. (more…)

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