Essential Report

Economy: Direct investment vs trickle-down approach

May 11, 2021

Q. And which of the following is closest to your view on the best way to create jobs and grow the economy?

  May’21 Oct’20
 
The government should directly invest in the economy by creating projects and jobs, and raise the standard of living for the majority of workers 66% 69%
The government should relax regulation and lower taxes for the wealthy to encourage businesses to grow and create jobs 17% 19%
Unsure 17% 13%
Base (n) 1,092 1,066
  • Most Australians’ want the government to directly invest in the economy by creating projects and jobs, and raise the standard of living for the majority of workers (66%), rather than relax regulation and lower taxes for the wealthy to encourage businesses to grow and create jobs (17%) to create jobs and grow the economy. This is consistent with levels last October (69% and 19% respectively).
  • Slightly more people are now unsure which the best approach is (17% from 13% in October).
Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other TOTAL:

Labor, Greens, Other

The government should directly invest in the economy by creating projects and jobs, and raise the standard of living for the majority of workers 66% 74% 64% 75% 69% 73%
The government should relax regulation and lower taxes for the wealthy to encourage businesses to grow and create jobs 17% 13% 23% 15% 17% 14%
Unsure 17% 13% 13% 10% 14% 12%
Base (n) 1,092 371 400 109 111 591
  • The majority of voters of all major parties want the government to directly invest in the economy by creating projects and jobs, and raise the standard of living for the majority of workers.

Priority for the upcoming budget

May 11, 2021

Q. Which one of the following options is closest to your thinking about what the priority should be of the upcoming budget?

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
The government should prioritise the reduction of national debt by cutting public funding for services 20% 24% 16% 27% 21% 13% 15% 22% 25% 33%
The government should prioritise providing support for people and industries struggling because of the pandemic 80% 76% 84% 73% 79% 87% 85% 78% 75% 67%
Base (n) 1,092 536 556 340 372 380 371 400 109 111
  • The majority of Australians think the government should prioritise providing support for people and industries struggling because of the pandemic in the upcoming budget (80%), over the reduction of national debt by cutting public funding for services (20%).
  • Preference for providing support for people and industries struggling because of the pandemic is highest among women (84%), those over 55 (87%) and Labor voters (85%).

Indicators of whether the Australian economy is in a good or poor state

May 11, 2021

Q. Which of the following indicators do you think is the most important when thinking about whether the Australian economy is in a good or poor state?

  May’21 Sep’20 Sep’19
The unemployment rate 25% 39% 25%
The cost of household bills 20% 13% 22%
The size of the national deficit 13%
The amount of homeless people on the streets 11% 8% 10%
The value of the Australian dollar to international currencies 8% 12% 13%
The gross domestic product per person 7% 7% 8%
The interest rate set by Reserve Bank of Australia 7% 6% 9%
The consumer price index 5% 6% 6%
The number of new shops, restaurants and cafes opening 5% 3% 2%
The size of the national surplus 6% 6%
Base (n) 1,092 1,081 1,097

 

Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
The unemployment rate 25% 24% 25% 28% 26% 21% 26% 21% 34% 25%
The cost of household bills 20% 19% 21% 18% 20% 21% 21% 19% 18% 18%
The size of the national deficit 13% 10% 15% 8% 13% 17% 10% 15% 7% 17%
The amount of homeless people on the streets 11% 8% 13% 11% 11% 11% 12% 8% 15% 7%
The value of the Australian dollar to international currencies 8% 9% 7% 12% 7% 6% 9% 8% 4% 7%
The gross domestic product per person 7% 9% 6% 7% 7% 8% 6% 10% 7% 6%
The interest rate set by Reserve Bank of Australia 7% 8% 6% 6% 8% 7% 7% 8% 3% 8%
The consumer price index 5% 7% 3% 6% 5% 4% 5% 6% 8% 3%
The number of new shops, restaurants and cafes opening 5% 6% 3% 5% 4% 5% 4% 5% 4% 9%
Base (n) 1,092 536 556 340 372 380 371 400 109 111
  • The unemployment rate is still thought to be the top indicator of the state of the Australian economy, with a quarter of Australians (25%) ranking it as most important.
  • Cost of household bills (20%), the size of the national deficit (13%) and levels of homelessness (11%) are also seen to be key indicators of the state of the economy.

Uptake of a Covid-19 vaccine

May 11, 2021

Q. The Covid-19 vaccine rollout is underway in Australia.

Once a vaccine becomes available to you, how long would you wait before taking it?

  10/05 26/04 15/03 01/03 18/01 14/12 10/08
I’d get vaccinated as soon as possible / I’ve already been vaccinated 44% 42% 47% 50% 42% 43% 56%
I’d get vaccinated, but wouldn’t do it straight away 42% 42% 40% 40% 47% 46% 35%
I’d never get vaccinated 14% 16% 12% 10% 11% 10% 8%
Base (n) 1,092 1,090 1,124 1,074 1,084 1,071 1,010
  • 44% of Australians now say they would get vaccinated as soon as possible or they’ve already been vaccinated (42% in April).
  • The proportion of people who say they would get vaccinated but not straight away is unchanged from last month (42%).
  • 14% now say they would never get vaccinated.
  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
I’d get vaccinated as soon as possible / I’ve already been vaccinated 44% 53% 35% 32% 41% 56% 43% 52% 40% 38%
I’d get vaccinated, but wouldn’t do it straight away 42% 34% 50% 48% 44% 37% 43% 39% 48% 44%
I’d never get vaccinated 14% 13% 15% 20% 15% 8% 14% 9% 12% 18%
Base (n) 1,092 536 556 340 372 380 371 400 109 111
  • Those most likely to get the vaccine immediately or already be vaccinated include men (53%) and those aged over 55 (56%).
  • Those voting for independent or minor parties are the most likely to say they would never get vaccinated (18%).

Views towards measures for people entering Australia from India

May 11, 2021

Q. To what extent do you support or oppose the following measures for people entering Australia from India?

  TOTAL: Support TOTAL: Oppose Strongly support Somewhat support Neither support nor oppose Somewhat oppose Strongly oppose
Banning Australian citizens in India from entering the country due to the risk of Covid-19 transmission 48% 27% 25% 22% 25% 14% 13%
Penalties of $50,000 fine and five years imprisonment for anyone attempting to arrive in Australia from India 41% 33% 23% 18% 26% 16% 17%
Allowing Australian citizens to return from India provided they complete the necessary quarantine procedures when they arrive 56% 22% 22% 33% 22% 12% 10%
  • Over half of Australians (56%) support allowing Australian citizens to return from India provided they complete the necessary quarantine procedures when they arrive.
  • However, just under half (48%) support banning Australian citizens in India from entering the country due to the risk of Covid-19 transmission and 41% support penalties of $50,000 fine and five years imprisonment for anyone attempting to arrive in Australia from India.
TOTAL: Support Total Age Group Federal Voting Intention
18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other TOTAL:

Labor, Greens, Other

Banning Australian citizens in India from entering the country due to the risk of Covid-19 transmission 48% 37% 54% 51% 46% 56% 43% 47% 46%
Penalties of $50,000 fine and five years imprisonment for anyone attempting to arrive in Australia from India 41% 33% 49% 40% 39% 48% 31% 44% 39%
Allowing Australian citizens to return from India provided they complete the necessary quarantine procedures when they arrive 56% 49% 54% 62% 58% 56% 64% 51% 58%
Base (n) 1,092 340 372 380 371 400 109 111 591
  • While support for allowing Australian citizens to return from India provided they complete the necessary quarantine procedures when they arrive is high across age groups, those over 55 are more likely to support this than younger cohorts (62% to 54% and 49% respectively).
  • Support for this measure is consistently high across party lines.
  • Those 18-34 are much less likely to support banning Australian citizens in India from entering the Australia due to the risk of Covid-19 transmission than older groups (37% to 54% of those 35-54 and 51% of those over 55).

Concern about military conflict with China

May 11, 2021

Q. In the past month, diplomatic tensions between Australia and China have increased, with Australia investing $750M to improve Australian Defence Force training facilities in the Northern Territory and Defence Minister Peter Dutton saying that a war with China over Taiwan should not “be discounted”.

To what extent are you concerned about Australia engaging in a military conflict with China in the near future?

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
Extremely concerned 18% 18% 18% 11% 21% 21% 18% 18% 23% 17%
Very concerned 21% 22% 21% 20% 23% 21% 21% 21% 22% 27%
Fairly concerned 36% 32% 39% 43% 29% 36% 38% 35% 25% 36%
Not very concerned 19% 21% 17% 19% 20% 18% 19% 18% 25% 19%
Not at all concerned 6% 8% 5% 7% 7% 5% 4% 8% 5% 1%
TOTAL: Concerned 39% 40% 39% 31% 44% 41% 39% 39% 45% 44%
TOTAL: Not concerned 25% 28% 22% 26% 27% 23% 23% 26% 31% 21%
Base (n) 1,092 536 556 340 372 380 371 400 109 111
  • 39% of Australians are concerned about Australia engaging in a military conflict with China in the near future, with 18% extremely concerned. 36% are fairly concerned, and a quarter (25%) are not concerned.
  • Those 18-34 are less likely to be concerned about this than older cohorts (31% to 44% of those 35-54 and 41% those over 55).

Uptake of a Covid-19 vaccine

Apr 26, 2021

Q. The Covid-19 vaccine rollout is underway in Australia.

Once a vaccine becomes available to you, how long would you wait before taking it?

  26/04 15/03 01/03 18/01 14/12 10/08
I’d get vaccinated as soon as possible / I’ve already been vaccinated 42% 47% 50% 42% 43% 56%
I’d get vaccinated, but wouldn’t do it straight away 42% 40% 40% 47% 46% 35%
I’d never get vaccinated 16% 12% 10% 11% 10% 8%
Base (n) 1,090 1,124 1,074 1,084 1,071 1,010
  • With the rocky start to the nationwide Covid-19 vaccine rollout, 42% of Australians now say they would get vaccinated as soon as possible or they’ve already been vaccinated. This is a drop from last month (47%) and a return to levels at the start of this year / end of last year.
  • About the same proportion of people as last month say that would get vaccinated but not straight away (42%).
  • 16% now say they would never get vaccinated, the highest proportion since first recording data in August last year.
  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
  Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
I’d get vaccinated as soon as possible / I’ve already been vaccinated 42% 49% 36% 33% 39% 53% 43% 52% 33% 35%
I’d get vaccinated, but wouldn’t do it straight away 42% 40% 44% 44% 44% 38% 45% 39% 50% 33%
I’d never get vaccinated 16% 12% 20% 23% 17% 9% 13% 10% 17% 33%
Base (n) 1,090 539 551 359 289 442 362 414 95 114
  • Those most likely to get the vaccine immediately or already be vaccinated include men (49%) and those aged over 55 (53%) – however for the latter group this is a notable drop from last month (was 60%).
  • Those voting for independent or minor parties are the most likely to say they would never get vaccinated (33%) – another significant increase since last month (20%).

Preference towards Covid-19 vaccines

Apr 26, 2021

Q. As you may be aware, there are currently two vaccines available in Australia – the Pfizer vaccine and the AstraZeneca (Oxford) vaccine.

Which of the following is closer to your view?

  Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-29 30-49 50-69 70 and over Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
I would be willing to get either the AstraZeneca vaccine or the Pfizer vaccine 37% 48% 27% 28% 31% 40% 61% 35% 47% 32% 31%
I would be willing to get the AstraZeneca vaccine but not the Pfizer vaccine 3% 4% 2% 6% 4% 1% 2% 4% 4% 3% 0%
I would be willing to get the Pfizer vaccine but not the AstraZeneca vaccine 27% 25% 28% 26% 29% 29% 16% 31% 28% 26% 22%
I would not be willing to get either the AstraZeneca vaccine or the Pfizer vaccine 14% 11% 18% 15% 15% 15% 11% 13% 10% 14% 30%
Unsure 19% 12% 25% 25% 21% 15% 11% 17% 11% 24% 18%
Base (n) 1,090 539 551 250 327 339 174 362 414 95 114
  • 37% would be willing to get either the AstraZeneca vaccine or the Pfizer vaccine, however, nearly a third (27%) say they would only be willing to get the Pfizer vaccine. 14% would not be willing to get either vaccine, and 19% are unsure. Only 3% would get the AstraZeneca vaccine but not the Pfizer vaccine.
  • Men are much more likely than women to be willing to get either vaccine (48% to 27% respectively); as women are more unsure (25% to 12% men).
  • Willingness to get either vaccine increases with age – while 28% of those 18-29 would be willing to receive either vaccine, this increases to 61% of those 70 and over.
  • Coalition voters are more likely to get either vaccine (47% to 35% Labor, 32% Greens and 31% minor and independent party voters).
  • Despite the recommendation against the AstraZeneca vaccine only applying to under 50s, those 50-69 are on par with those under 50 in terms of their willingness to get the Pfizer vaccine but not the AstraZeneca vaccine. The proportion of those who would only be willing to get the Pfizer vaccine and not the AstraZeneca vaccine is consistent across all age groups under 70 – 26% of those 18-29, 29% of those 30-49, 29% of those 50-69 compared to 16% of those 70 and over would be willing to get the Pfizer vaccine only.
Pages:«12345678...537»

COVID-19 RESEARCH

Read Essential's ongoing research on the public response to Covid-19.

Sign up for updates

Receive the Essential Report in your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.