Essential Report

Outcomes of COP26 – Global and local impact

Nov 9, 2021

Q. How confident are you that the UN climate summit (COP26) will result in meaningful changes to address climate change and reduce emissions globally and locally (in Australia)? GLOBALLY

Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
Very confident 9% 10% 8% 15% 8% 4% 8% 10% 4% 11%
Fairly confident 27% 26% 28% 30% 34% 17% 31% 29% 32% 12%
Not that confident 34% 32% 36% 32% 29% 41% 39% 32% 32% 37%
Not confident at all 18% 23% 13% 10% 16% 27% 13% 19% 22% 29%
Unsure 13% 9% 16% 13% 13% 11% 9% 9% 10% 10%
TOTAL: Confident 35% 36% 35% 45% 43% 20% 39% 39% 36% 24%
TOTAL: Not confident 52% 55% 49% 42% 44% 68% 52% 51% 55% 66%
Base (n) 1,089 534 555 336 374 379 354 401 106 125

 

Q. How confident are you that the UN climate summit (COP26) will result in meaningful changes to address climate change and reduce emissions globally and locally (in Australia)? LOCALLY

Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
Very confident 9% 11% 8% 14% 10% 5% 11% 12% 4% 6%
Fairly confident 28% 28% 27% 31% 32% 22% 24% 38% 17% 27%
Not that confident 30% 26% 33% 28% 25% 36% 34% 27% 30% 25%
Not confident at all 22% 26% 19% 14% 22% 30% 23% 15% 41% 34%
Unsure 11% 8% 13% 13% 11% 9% 9% 8% 8% 8%
TOTAL: Confident 37% 40% 35% 45% 42% 26% 35% 50% 21% 32%
TOTAL: Not confident 52% 52% 52% 42% 47% 65% 56% 42% 72% 59%
Base (n) 1,089 534 555 336 374 379 354 401 106 125
  • Around half of people are not confident that the COP26 summit will result in meaningful change – either globally or locally (both 52%).
  • Those aged over 55 have less confidence in change due to COP26 (68% not confident in global change, 68% not confident in global change, 65% not confident in local change).
  • People voting for the Greens are more confident that COP26 with result in global change than local change (36% to 21%).

Attitudes to climate change and COP26

Nov 9, 2021

Q. The UN climate summit (COP26) started on October 31 in Glasgow, Scotland. During the summit, world leaders are expected to develop the next emissions standards to slow global warming and keep temperature rise below 1.5C.

Australia is one of 200 countries expected to outline their emissions reduction goals for 2030.

To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

TOTAL: Agree 08/11 11/10
Australian businesses have the opportunity to develop expertise in renewable energy and innovative technologies that other countries will demand 71% 64%
Australian manufacturing could benefit from cheap electricity if more solar and wind farms were built 69% 63%
Australia cannot afford to be locked out of the EU or other trade markets for failing to adopt a net zero emissions by 2050 target 66% 57%
Australia needs to follow other countries’ lead and make climate change a priority, or risk being left behind 65% 57%

 

  TOTAL:

Agree

TOTAL:

Disagree

Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
Australian businesses have the opportunity to develop expertise in renewable energy and innovative technologies that other countries will demand 71% 6% 35% 35% 23% 4% 2%
Australian manufacturing could benefit from cheap electricity if more solar and wind farms were built 69% 9% 37% 33% 21% 5% 5%
Australia cannot afford to be locked out of the EU or other trade markets for failing to adopt a net zero emissions by 2050 target 66% 8% 33% 33% 25% 5% 3%
Australia needs to follow other countries’ lead and make climate change a priority, or risk being left behind 65% 12% 34% 32% 23% 7% 5%

 

TOTAL: Agree Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
Australian businesses have the opportunity to develop expertise in renewable energy and innovative technologies that other countries will demand 71% 70% 72% 59% 70% 81% 75% 74% 75% 64%
Australian manufacturing could benefit from cheap electricity if more solar and wind farms were built 69% 66% 73% 62% 72% 74% 76% 70% 77% 55%
Australia cannot afford to be locked out of the EU or other trade markets for failing to adopt a net zero emissions by 2050 target 66% 63% 69% 57% 66% 74% 71% 66% 76% 60%
Australia needs to follow other countries’ lead and make climate change a priority, or risk being left behind 65% 63% 67% 58% 70% 66% 71% 66% 79% 50%
Base (n) 1,089 534 555 336 374 379 354 401 106 125
  • Since the exposure of COP26, more people are engaged with both the opportunities and threats from the country not acting on climate change and reducing emissions.
  • 71% now agree that Australian businesses have the opportunity to develop expertise in renewable energy and innovative technologies that other countries will demand, up from 64% last month. Similarly, agreement that Australian manufacturing could benefit from cheap electricity if more solar and wind farms were built has increased from 63% to 69%.
  • At the same time, agreement with the risks of not acting have increased. 66% agree that Australia cannot afford to be locked out of the EU or other trade markets for failing to adopt a net zero emissions by 2050 target (up from 57% before the summit) and 65% agree that Australia needs to follow other countries’ lead and make climate change a priority, or risk being left behind.
  • Those voting Labor and Greens are more likely than those voting Coalition or other to agree with the risks of not acting on climate change.

Federal voting intention

Oct 28, 2021

Q. If a federal election was held tomorrow, to which party would you give your first preference vote in the House of Representatives (Lower House)?

[If don’t know] Well which party are you currently leaning towards?

This week

25/10

Two weeks ago

11/10

27/09 13/09 30/08 16/08 02/08 19/07 05/07
Liberal / Liberal Nationals / Country Liberals 35% 34% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 34% 35%
Nationals 2% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 3% 3% 2%
Total: Coalition 37% 36% 38% 38% 38% 37% 38% 37% 37%
Labor 36% 34% 36% 34% 36% 36% 35% 36% 36%
Greens 10% 9% 9% 8% 10% 9% 9% 10% 8%
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 3% 4% 3% 4% 4% 3% 4% 4% 4%
Other/Independent 8% 8% 6% 8% 6% 6% 6% 6% 5%
Undecided 6% 9% 6% 8% 7% 8% 8% 8% 8%
     
2 Party Preferred (2PP+)    
TOTAL: Coalition 44% 45% 46% 46% 45% 45% 45% 45% 44%
Labor 49% 46% 48% 46% 48% 47% 47% 47% 48%
Undecided 6% 9% 6% 8% 7% 8% 8% 8% 8%

 

Performance of State Premiers

Oct 26, 2021

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of the job <NAME> is doing as State Premier?

[Only asked in NSW, VIC, QLD, SA and WA]

TOTAL: Approve 25/10/21 16/11/20 02/11/20 19/10/20
[Prior to Oct’21] Gladys Berejiklian

[Oct’21 onwards] Dominic Perrottet

NSW

47% 75% 68% 67%
Daniel Andrews

VIC

52% 65% 61% 54%
Annastacia Palaszczuk

QLD

66% 65% 65% 62%
Steven Marshall

SA

61% 60% 71% 51%
Mark McGowan

WA

82% 87% 78% 84%
Base (n) 1,781 1,036 1,063 1,082
  • Approval of Dominic Perrottet among those in NSW is at 47%, however as he has just been in the job for a short period of time, there is a large number who are as yet unsure of him (25%). Last October, approval of Gladys Berejiklian was at 67%.
  • Approval of Daniel Andrews among Victorians is at 52%, around the same level as last October (54%) but a drop from the level last November (65%).
  • Approval of Steven Marshall among South Australians remains at 61%, around the same level as last November (60%).
  • Approval of Annastacia Palaszczuk among Queenslanders and Mark McGowan among Western Australians remain at similar levels as last October at 66% and 82% respectively.
 

 

Dominic Perrottet NSW Daniel Andrews

VIC

Annastacia Palaszczuk

QLD

Steven Marshall

SA

Mark McGowan

WA

Strongly approve 9% 20% 26% 15% 46%
Approve 38% 32% 40% 46% 36%
Disapprove 17% 16% 12% 18% 8%
Strongly disapprove 11% 24% 15% 8% 5%
Don’t know 25% 9% 7% 13% 5%
TOTAL: Approve 47% 52% 66% 61% 82%
TOTAL: Disapprove 28% 40% 27% 27% 13%
Base (n) 352 275 217 443 441
  • Nearly half (46%) of Western Australians strongly approve of the job Mark McGowan is doing as State Premier.
  • About a quarter (26%) of Queenslanders strongly approve of the job Annastacia Palaszczuk is doing as State Premier.
  • While 20% of Victorians strongly approve of the job Daniel Andrews is doing as State Premier, about a quarter (24%) strongly disapprove.
  • A quarter (25%) of those in NSW are unsure about the job newly appointed State Premier Dominic Perrottet is doing.

Federal government response to Covid-19

Oct 26, 2021

Q. Overall, how would you rate the federal government’s response to the Covid-19 outbreak?

  25/10 11/10 27/09 13/09 30/08 16/08 02/08 19/07 05/07 07/06 24/05 12/04 15/03
Very poor 12% 12% 12% 16% 16% 13% 16% 13% 12% 10% 6% 7% 5%
Quite poor 19% 18% 18% 20% 20% 22% 19% 19% 17% 14% 12% 10% 7%
Neither good nor poor 24% 25% 25% 21% 24% 24% 28% 23% 26% 22% 25% 21% 18%
Quite good 32% 32% 34% 28% 29% 32% 28% 32% 33% 38% 40% 40% 39%
Very good 14% 13% 11% 15% 10% 9% 10% 14% 11% 15% 18% 22% 31%
TOTAL: Poor 31% 30% 30% 35% 36% 35% 35% 31% 30% 24% 18% 17% 12%
TOTAL: Good 46% 45% 45% 43% 39% 41% 38% 46% 44% 53% 58% 62% 70%
Base (n) 1,781 1,097 1,094 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,098 1,100 1,099 1,104 1,100 1,368 1,124

 

TOTAL: Good 25/10 11/10 27/09 13/09 30/08 16/08 02/08 19/07 05/07 07/06 24/05 12/04 15/03
NSW 50% 48% 48% 41% 34% 34% 39% 49% 44% 62% 56% 66% 69%
VIC 34% 37% 39% 39% 35% 37% 33% 39% 40% 42% 57% 55% 65%
QLD 46% 50% 44% 43% 45% 44% 40% 46% 48% 54% 56% 63% 69%
SA 52% 46% 42% 54% 48% 45% 48% 51% 48% 58% 66% 62% 78%
WA 46% 49% 48% 51% 51% 53% 37% 51% 42% 49% 56% 65% 75%
  • 46% of people rate the federal government’s response to the Covid-19 outbreak as quite good or very good (similar to earlier this month), with 31% rating it as quite poor or very poor.
  • The only state to record an improvement in positive rating of the federal government’s handling of Covid-19 is South Australia (52% from 46% earlier in October).

State government response to Covid-19

Oct 26, 2021

Q. How would you rate your state government’s response to the Covid-19 outbreak?

TOTAL: Good 25/10 11/10 27/09 13/09 30/08 16/08 02/08 19/07 05/07 07/06 24/05 12/04 15/03
NSW 57% 55% 53% 46% 40% 42% 47% 54% 57% 69% 68% 73% 75%
VIC 43% 46% 44% 50% 44% 56% 54% 49% 50% 48% 63% 58% 62%
QLD 59% 68% 62% 65% 67% 66% 60% 62% 61% 65% 68% 72% 75%
SA 66% 67% 55% 67% 76% 68% 73% 68% 67% 67% 71% 75% 85%
WA 78% 80% 82% 87% 78% 87% 82% 77% 86% 75% 77% 84% 91%
  • Positive rating of the state government’s response to Covid-19 in NSW continues to increase (now 57%, up from 40% in August).
  • Compared to earlier this month, positive rating has remained at a similar level in SA and WA, and decreased in VIC and most notably in QLD (now 59%, from 68%). This is the lowest rating in Queensland this year.

Immigration levels

Oct 26, 2021

Q. Do you think the levels of immigration into Australia over the past ten years have been…?

Oct’21 Jan’19 Apr’18 Oct’16
Much too low 5% 4% 1% 4%
A little too low 11% 7% 4% 8%
About right 36% 26% 23% 28%
A little too high 17% 23% 27% 22%
Much too high 20% 33% 37% 28%
Don’t know 11% 6% 7% 10%
TOTAL: Too low 16% 12% 5% 12%
TOTAL: Too high 37% 56% 64% 50%
  • Significantly fewer people now think levels of immigration into Australia over the last decade have been too high, compared to January 2019 and prior.
  • Over a third (37%) of people now think immigration levels are too high, compared to 56% in January 2019, 64% in April 2018 and 50% in October 2016.
  • This is driven by an increase of people who think immigration levels are about right (36% from 26% in January 2019).
  • 16% of people now think immigration levels are too low.
Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
Much too low 5% 6% 4% 6% 5% 4% 7% 3% 7% 7%
A little too low 11% 12% 10% 14% 8% 12% 13% 9% 16% 11%
About right 36% 37% 35% 40% 36% 34% 38% 39% 43% 31%
A little too high 17% 16% 17% 16% 17% 17% 16% 21% 9% 13%
Much too high 20% 20% 20% 13% 20% 26% 18% 23% 10% 28%
Don’t know 11% 8% 14% 11% 13% 8% 8% 5% 15% 9%
TOTAL: Too low 16% 18% 14% 20% 13% 15% 20% 12% 23% 19%
TOTAL: Too high 37% 37% 37% 29% 38% 43% 34% 44% 19% 41%
Base (n) 1,781 875 906 533 601 647 636 610 157 220
  • Those aged over 55 are more likely than younger cohorts to think immigration levels are too high (43% to 38% of those aged 35-54, and 29% of those aged 18-34). A quarter (26%) of those over 55 think the levels are much too high.
  • Among voters, Coalition voters (44%) are most likely to think immigration levels are too high, followed by minor and independent party voters (41%). Greens voters (19%) are least likely to think this. About a third (34%) of Labor voters think the levels are too high.

Views towards immigration

Oct 26, 2021

Q. The NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet recently called for an increase in Australia’s immigration levels.

To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

  TOTAL:

Agree

TOTAL:

Disagree

Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
Increasing immigration levels would add more pressure on the housing system and infrastructure 63% 11% 31% 32% 25% 8% 4%
Immigration is vital for Australia’s business and economy 51% 20% 18% 33% 29% 11% 9%
Increasing immigration levels would equip businesses with the skilled workers they need to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions are eased 50% 22% 16% 33% 28% 13% 9%
Increasing immigration levels would help to address Australia’s growing skills shortages as the population ages 49% 22% 14% 35% 29% 13% 9%
Increasing immigration levels would create more competition for jobs and slow wage growth 48% 21% 18% 30% 31% 13% 7%

 

TOTAL: Agree Total Gender Age Group Federal Voting Intention
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ Labor TOTAL: Coalition Greens TOTAL: Other
Increasing immigration levels would add more pressure on the housing system and infrastructure 63% 62% 64% 54% 65% 70% 66% 65% 59% 64%
Immigration is vital for Australia’s business and economy 51% 54% 48% 53% 50% 50% 56% 54% 60% 39%
Increasing immigration levels would equip businesses with the skilled workers they need to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions are eased 50% 52% 47% 50% 47% 51% 54% 52% 56% 42%
Increasing immigration levels would help to address Australia’s growing skills shortages as the population ages 49% 51% 46% 48% 46% 52% 53% 51% 57% 39%
Increasing immigration levels would create more competition for jobs and slow wage growth 48% 51% 45% 50% 50% 46% 51% 48% 45% 51%
Base (n) 1,781 875 906 533 601 647 636 610 157 220
  • Older cohorts are more likely to agree than younger groups that increasing immigration levels would add more pressure on the housing system and infrastructure. 70% of those over 55 agree with this statement, compared to 65% of those aged 35-54 and 54% of those aged 18-34. Agreement with this statement is consistent across voters.
  • Men are more likely than women to agree that immigration is vital for Australia’s business and economy (54% to 48% respectively).
  • Minor and independent party voters are least likely to agree that immigration is vital for Australia’s business and economy (39%), that increasing immigration levels would equip businesses with the skilled workers they need (42%), and help to address Australia’s growing skills shortages as the population ages (39%).
TOTAL: Agree People who say the levels of immigration have been

too low

People who say the levels of immigration have been

about right

People who say the levels of immigration have been

too high

Increasing immigration levels would add more pressure on the housing system and infrastructure 47% 62% 76%
Immigration is vital for Australia’s business and economy 74% 60% 34%
Increasing immigration levels would equip businesses with the skilled workers they need to reopen as Covid-19 restrictions are eased 77% 58% 34%
Increasing immigration levels would help to address Australia’s growing skills shortages as the population ages 75% 56% 34%
Increasing immigration levels would create more competition for jobs and slow wage growth 47% 48% 53%
Base (n) 277 645 694
  • Those who think immigration levels have been too high in the past decade are less likely to agree with the benefits and business need for immigration.
  • Those who think immigration levels have been too low are more likely to agree that immigration is vital for business and economy (74% to 60% ‘about right’ and 34% ‘too high’), and that increasing immigration levels would equip businesses with the skilled workers they need (77% to 58% and 34%), and help to address Australia’s growing skills shortages as the population ages (75% to 56% and 34%).
  • Those who think the levels are too high are more likely to think increasing levels would add more pressure on the housing system and infrastructure (76% to 47%).
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