Trust in Institutions

Jul 1, 2014

Q. How much trust do you have in the following institutions and organisations?

 

Total

trust

 

A lot of trust

Some trust

A little trust

No trust

Don’t know

% change

 

Total trust

12 Jun 12

Total trust

18 Mar 13

The High Court

57%

20%

37%

27%

12%

4%

-17

60%

74%

The ABC

54%

18%

36%

29%

13%

5%

-16

54%

70%

The Reserve Bank

52%

17%

35%

30%

13%

5%

-12

49%

64%

Charitable organisations

45%

6%

39%

36%

14%

4%

-7

50%

52%

Your local council

33%

5%

28%

38%

24%

4%

-1

na

34%

TV news media

32%

2%

26%

47%

23%

3%

+2

21%

30%

Environment groups

31%

5%

26%

38%

25%

5%

-10

32%

41%

The Commonwealth Public Service

31%

5%

26%

40%

19%

10%

-5

30%

36%

Newspapers

30%

3%

27%

46%

21%

3%

-

26%

30%

Religious organisations

26%

5%

21%

28%

41%

4%

-1

27%

27%

Federal Parliament

25%

4%

21%

33%

39%

3%

-9

22%

34%

Online news media

25%

2%

23%

49%

21%

4%

-2

23%

27%

State Parliament

24%

3%

21%

35%

37%

4%

-6

na

30%

Trade unions

22%

4%

18%

33%

39%

7%

-3

22%

25%

Business groups

22%

1%

21%

44%

27%

6%

-4

22%

26%

Political parties

13%

2%

11%

33%

50%

3%

+1

12%

12%

 Note: ‘Total Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by adding ‘A lot of trust’ and ‘Some trust’

Since this question was last asked in March last year, there has been a significant decline in trust in the High Court (-17%), the ABC (-16%), the Reserve Bank (-12%), environment groups (-10) and the Federal Parliament (-9). Trust in the High Court, ABC and Reserve Bank is back to similar levels to that recorded in 2012.

Respondents had most trust in the High Court (57%), the ABC (54%), the Reserve Bank (52%) and charitable organisations (45%). They had least trust in political parties (13%), trade unions (22%) and business groups (22%).

Compared to the average, Labor voters had more trust in the ABC (62%), environment groups (41%) and trade unions (34%).

Liberal/National voters, compared to the average, had a little more trust in the Reserve Bank (62%), Federal Parliament (43%), State Parliament (36%) and business groups (32%).

Cutting funding to ABC

Apr 22, 2014

Q. Would you approve or disapprove of cutting funding to the ABC?

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Total approve

21%

12%

37%

8%

15%

Total disapprove

61%

70%

43%

85%

75%

Strongly approve

7%

2%

16%

3%

5%

Approve

14%

10%

21%

5%

10%

Disapprove

29%

29%

30%

12%

38%

Strongly disapprove

32%

41%

13%

73%

37%

Don’t know

18%

19%

20%

7%

10%

61% disapprove (including 32% strongly disapprove) of cutting funding to the ABC and 21% approve.

Those most likely to disapprove were Greens voters (85%), other voters (75%) and Labor voters (70%). Liberal/National voters were split 37% approve and 43% disapprove.

Those aged 55+ were a little more likely to approve  – 26% approve/60% disapprove. 28% of men approved compared to only 14% of women.

Reason for cutting funding to ABC

Apr 22, 2014

Q. If the Federal Government cut funding to the ABC do you think it would be because:

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

The Government needs to reduce overall spending

45%

36%

64%

25%

39%

The Government doesn’t like the ABC’s news coverage

28%

38%

6%

65%

36%

The ABC has more than enough funding to do its job efficiently

10%

6%

17%

1%

7%

Don’t know

18%

20%

13%

9%

18%

45% think that funding cuts to the ABC would be made because the Government needs to reduce overall spending and 28% think it would be because the Government doesn’t like the ABC’s news coverage.

Those more likely to think it would be because the Government doesn’t like the ABC’s news coverage were Greens voters (65%), Labor voters (38%), income less than $600pw (38%) and university educated (34%).

Trust in media coverage of election campaign

Aug 19, 2013

Q. How much trust do you have in the way the following media have reported and commented on the election campaign so far?

 

Total a lot/sometrust

 

A lot of trust

Some trust

Not much trust

No trust at all

Don’t know

Don’t use

ABC TV

58%

22%

36%

10%

7%

8%

17%

SBS TV

52%

16%

36%

9%

5%

10%

24%

Commercial TV

29%

3%

26%

34%

19%

9%

9%

ABC radio

49%

16%

33%

10%

8%

8%

25%

Commercial radio

25%

4%

21%

27%

19%

10%

18%

The Australian

31%

5%

26%

15%

16%

9%

27%

The Telegraph (NSW)

25%

7%

18%

21%

28%

7%

19%

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW)

39%

7%

32%

21%

16%

8%

17%

The Age (Victoria)

42%

7%

35%

21%

13%

9%

15%

Herald Sun (Victoria)

30%

5%

25%

25%

26%

8%

12%

Courier Mail (Queensland)

23%

2%

21%

20%

21%

9%

27%

The most trusted media for coverage of the election campaign were ABC TV (58% trust), SBS TV (52%) and ABC radio (49%).

The most trusted newspapers were The Age (42%) and the Sydney Morning Herald (39%).

The least trusted media were the Courier Mail (23%), The Telegraph (25%) and commercial radio (25%).

Privatisation of ABC and SBS

Jun 3, 2013

Q. Would you support or oppose the privatisation of the ABC and SBS?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total support

15%

11%

21%

3%

Total oppose

57%

68%

51%

75%

Strongly support

4%

3%

6%

-

Support

11%

8%

15%

3%

Oppose

25%

24%

28%

22%

Strongly oppose

32%

44%

23%

53%

Don’t know

28%

21%

28%

22%

15% support the privatisation of the ABC and SBS and 57% oppose. 28% did not give an opinion.

Strongest opposition came from men (61%), people aged 55+ (74%) and those on incomes under $1,000pw (68%).

Funding for the ABC

Oct 8, 2012

Q. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) currently receives about $950 million a year from government, including money for transmission. In terms of future funding, do you think the ABC should receive:

 

%

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total – More funding

34%

42%

27%

67%

Total – Less funding

17%

13%

23%

6%

A lot more funding

11%

15%

6%

24%

Some more funding

23%

27%

21%

43%

About the same funding as current levels

32%

31%

37%

21%

A little less funding

8%

8%

10%

4%

A lot less funding less funding

9%

5%

13%

2%

Don’t know

17%

14%

13%

5%

The largest portion of respondents believe that the ABC should receiving more funding (34%) followed very closely by those that believe funding at current levels should remain (32%).

Seventeen per cent (17%) believe that the ABC should receive less funding.

Looking at the results by voting intention, Greens voters are the most in favour of more funding for the ABC (67%), whilst Coalition voters are the most likely to take the view that the ABC should receive less funding (23%).

Looking at the results by gender, male respondents are far more likely to support more funding for the ABC (44%) compared to female respondents (25%).

What next for public broadcasters in the digital age?

Jul 10, 2012

If SBS and the ABC don’t get a substantial increase in funding, their future is shaky, warns Nadine Flood.



The old media empires are being transformed by a new audience which doesn’t pay for its news. The News Corporation scandal in the UK is turning people away from newspapers. So what are the ramifications for public broadcasting?

CPSU’s Nadine Flood tells 3Q the role of the national broadcasters will be more important than ever. Investigative journalism and public accountability are at risk. But public funding must increase if they are to fulfil their roles and continue to innovate.

TRENDS: Loss of trust spreading beyond Parliament

Jun 25, 2012



Peter Lewis spells out how Aussies have little trust in anyone or anything — except maybe the ABC.

Trust is hot property in politics. Everyone wants to claim it while undermining their opponent’s. Broken promises are played hard in the hope of achieving political bingo: irreparable reputational damage.

Labor’s flat-lining polls are widely attributed to Julia Gillard’s ‘trust issues’. Mind you, Tony Abbott isn’t considered to be excelling in the trustworthy stakes either. They barely muster a pass mark between them.

But something even more insidious is beginning to occur, as this week’s Essential Report suggests. Loss of trust is contagious. We’re not just cynical about politicians; we are also losing faith in the institutions that underpin public life.

Read the full article on The Drum.

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