Level of tax

Mar 10, 2015

Q.  Do you think the following pay too much tax, not enough tax or about the right amount?

*DPN = Don’t pay enough

Total

Labor voters

Lib/Nat voters

Pay too much

DPN

Pay about right 

Don’t know

Pay too much

DPN

Pay about right 

Don’t know

Pay too much

DPN

Pay about right 

Don’t know

Large
business

3%

64%

14%

19%

3%

72%

8%

17%

3%

60%

21%

16%

Small
business

41%

6%

34%

19%

39%

8%

40%

14%

43%

6%

36%

15%

People on
low incomes

47%

5%

36%

13%

57%

4%

30%

9%

34%

6%

48%

12%

People on average incomes

43%

5%

41%

11%

52%

4%

36%

8%

33%

7%

50%

10%

People on
high incomes

10%

59%

19%

12%

9%

66%

17%

8%

9%

56%

25%

11%

You
personally

36%

4%

47%

13%

40%

4%

45%

11%

29%

5%

53%

13%

Mining companies

4%

67%

12%

17%

3%

75%

9%

13%

4%

63%

18%

15%

Retirees
on large incomes

15%

29%

30%

26%

15%

33%

29%

22%

14%

26%

38%

23%

Large intl companies (such as Google & Apple)

2%

73%

8%

18%

2%

74%

8%

16%

2%

73%

10%

15%

Religious
organisation

5%

53%

16%

26%

4%

54%

15%

27%

5%

53%

21%

21%

From the groups listed, people on low income (47%), small businesses (41%) and people on average incomes (43%) were the groups respondents were most likely to think pay too much tax.

More than half of respondents believe that ‘large international companies’ (73%), ‘large businesses’ (64%), ‘mining companies’ (67%), and ‘religious organisations’ (53%) do not pay enough tax.

Overall, Labor voters were more likely than Liberal voters to think the following groups pay too much tax – low incomes (Labor 57%/LNP34%), average incomes (52%/33%) and ‘you personally’ (40%/29%). Labor voters were also more likely to think the following don’t pay enough tax – large businesses (72%/60%), people on high incomes (66%/56%) and mining companies (75%/63%).

Impact of higher tax on multinational corporations

Mar 10, 2015

Q. Do you think that making big multinational corporations pay more tax would be good for the economy because it would increase Government revenue or bad for the economy because these companies would stop investing in Australia? 

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote Other

Good for the economy

60%

65%

61%

66%

62%

Bad for the economy

13%

12%

14%

8%

12%

Don’t know

27%

23%

25%

26%

26%

60% think that making big multinational corporations pay more tax would be good for the economy because it would increase Government revenue and 13% think it would be bad for the economy because these companies would stop investing in Australia.

More than 60% of all voter groups believe it would be good for the economy. 66% of men and 72% of respondents aged 55+ think it would be good for the economy.

Sending troops to Iraq

Mar 10, 2015

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of sending more Australian troops to Iraq to help train Iraqi forces fighting Islamic State militants? 

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote Other

Total approve

36%

28%

54%

15%

35%

Total disapprove

50%

60%

35%

72%

56%

Strongly approve

7%

5%

10%

2%

6%

Approve

29%

23%

44%

13%

29%

Disapprove

29%

31%

25%

36%

31%

Strongly disapprove

21%

29%

10%

36%

25%

Don’t know

14%

12%

11%

13%

10%

36% approve of sending more Australian troops to Iraq to help train Iraqi forces fighting Islamic State militants and 50% disapprove.

A majority of Liberal/National voters (54%) approve but other voter groups strongly disapprove – 60% of Labor voters and 72% of Greens voters.

Men are divided (45% approve/45% disapprove) while women strongly disapprove (27% approve/55% disapprove).

Impact of sending troops to Iraq

Mar 10, 2015

Q. Do you think sending troops to Iraq will make Australia more safe or less safe from terrorism?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote Other

More safe

12%

8%

20%

5%

8%

Less safe

30%

33%

22%

44%

34%

Make no difference

47%

51%

47%

37%

53%

Don’t know

10%

7%

10%

13%

5%

30% think sending more troops to Iraq will make Australia less safe from terrorism and 12% think it will make Australia more safe. 47% think it will make no difference.

Government support

Mar 10, 2015

Q. Thinking about Government welfare and services, do you think the following groups of people receive enough support, too much support or about the right support from the Government?

 

Too much support

Not enough support

About the right support

Don’t know

Children

11%

38%

38%

13%

Young adults

15%

41%

32%

11%

Families with school-aged children

14%

36%

38%

11%

Middle aged

8%

33%

44%

15%

Retirees

6%

56%

27%

11%

A majority (56%) think that retirees don’t get enough Government support and 41% don’t think young adults get enough support. 44% think middle aged people get about the right support.

By age group, those most likely to think each group does not get enough support were –

Children – aged 35-54 43%

Young adults – aged 18-24 54%

Families with school-aged children – aged 25-44 41%

Middle aged – aged 45-54 45%

Retirees – aged 45-64 66%

Federal politics – voting intention

Mar 3, 2015

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,820 respondents 

First preference/leaning to

Election

7 Sep 13

 

4 weeks ago

3/2/15

2 weeks ago 17/2/15

Last week

24/2/15

This week 3/3/15

Liberal

 

35%

36%

38%

37%

National

3%

3%

3%

3%

Total Liberal/National

45.6%

38%

39%

40%

40%

Labor

33.4%

41%

41%

41%

41%

Greens

8.6%

9%

10%

9%

9%

Palmer United Party

5.5%

3%

2%

2%

2%

Other/Independent

6.9%

9%

8%

8%

9%

 

2 Party Preferred

Election

7 Sep 13

 

4 weeks ago

3/2/15

2 weeks ago 17/2/15

Last week

24/2/15

This week 3/3/15

Liberal National

53.5%

46%

46%

47%

47%

Labor

46.5%

54%

54%

53%

53%

 

NB. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2013 election. 

Threat of terrorism

Mar 3, 2015

Q. Over the last few years, do you think that the threat of terrorism happening in Australia has increased, decreased or stayed much the same? 

  

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Sep 2014

Total increased

75%

74%

84%

54%

83%

57%

Total decreased

2%

3%

2%

3%

1%

6%

Increased a lot

39%

37%

46%

18%

52%

22%

Increased a little

36%

37%

38%

36%

31%

35%

Stayed about the same

20%

21%

14%

39%

13%

33%

Decreased a little

1%

2%

1%

1%

-

3%

Decreased a lot

1%

1%

1%

2%

1%

3%

Don’t know

4%

1%

1%

5%

3%

4%

 

75% think that the threat of terrorism happening in Australia has increased – up from 57% recorded in September. 20% (down 13%) think it has stayed about the same and 2% (down 4%) think it has decreased.

Those most likely to think it has increased were Liberal/National voters (84%) and those aged 55+ (85%).

Spending on anti-terrorism

Mar 3, 2015

Q. Do you think the Australian Government should be spending more or less on anti-terrorism measures or is current spending about right?

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Aug 2014

Spending more

39%

38%

47%

19%

46%

28%

Spending less

12%

13%

5%

37%

14%

19%

Current spending about right

33%

31%

41%

26%

25%

36%

Don’t know

16%

17%

6%

18%

14%

16%

 

39% think the Australian Government should be spending more on anti-terrorism measures – up 11% since August.  12% (down 7%) think they should be spending less – 33% (down 3%) think the current spending is about right.

Those most likely to support spending more were aged 45+ (48%) and Liberal/National voters (47%).

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