Importance of mining

Oct 14, 2014

Q. Compared to five years ago, do you think mining is more important to Australia’s economy, less important to our economy or is it about the same importance?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote Other

More important than 5 years ago

22%

23%

27%

14%

21%

Less important than 5 years ago

24%

26%

21%

30%

28%

About the same importance

42%

40%

48%

49%

34%

Don’t know

12%

11%

5%

7%

17%

42% think mining is of about the same importance to the economy as five years ago – 24% think it is less important and 22% think it is more important.

Those more likely to think it is less important were aged 18-34 (29%) and Greens voters (30%).

Benefit from mining exports

Oct 14, 2014

Q. How much do the following groups benefit from Australian mining exports? 

 

Benefit a lot

Some benefit

A little benefit

No benefit

Don’t know

Mining company executives

67%

14%

5%

1%

12%

Mining company shareholders

40%

37%

10%

1%

12%

Foreign companies

37%

32%

11%

1%

18%

Federal government

27%

39%

18%

2%

14%

State governments

22%

40%

21%

2%

15%

Regional communities

8%

27%

35%

15%

16%

All Australians

4%

25%

41%

16%

15%

Poor people in the countries we export to

3%

11%

24%

43%

20%

Respondents believed those who benefit most from Australian mining exports are mining company executives (67% benefit a lot), mining company shareholders (40%) and foreign companies (37%).

Those that benefit least are poor people in the countries we export to (67% little/no benefit), all Australians (57%) and regional communities (50%).

Government financial actions

Oct 14, 2014

Q. The government is considering savings and taxing options to pay for the war in Iraq, lower commodity prices and its inability to pass savings from its May budget this year. Would you approve or disapprove of the following actions it might take?

 

Total approve

Total dis-approve

 

Strongly approve

Approve

Dis-approve

Strongly dis-approve

Don’t know

Higher corporate tax

68%

22%

26%

42%

15%

7%

10%

Abandon its paid parental leave scheme

56%

31%

31%

25%

17%

14%

12%

Cuts to tax concessions in areas like superannuation

21%

67%

4%

17%

33%

34%

13%

Higher income taxes

21%

69%

5%

16%

31%

38%

10%

Cuts to social services, health or education

12%

81%

2%

10%

26%

55%

7%

A majority approve of higher corporate tax (68%) and abandoning the paid parental leave scheme (56%) to pay for the war in Iraq, lower commodity prices and the Government’s inability to pass savings from its May budget this year.

A majority would disapprove of cuts to social services, health or education (81%), higher income taxes (69%) and cuts to tax concessions in areas like superannuation (67%).

Federal politics – voting intention

Oct 7, 2014

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to? 

Sample size = 1,796 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election

7 Sep 13

 

4 weeks ago 9/9/14

2 weeks ago

23/9/14

Last week

30/9/14

This week

7/10/14

Liberal

 

36%

36%

37%

38%

National

3%

3%

2%

2%

Total Liberal/National

45.6%

39%

39%

40%

40%

Labor

33.4%

38%

39%

39%

39%

Greens

8.6%

10%

10%

10%

10%

Palmer United Party

5.5%

4%

4%

4%

4%

Other/Independent

6.9%

9%

8%

8%

7%

 

2 Party Preferred

Election

7 Sep 13

 

4 weeks ago 9/9/14

2 weeks ago

23/9/14

Last week

30/9/14

This week

7/10/14

Liberal National

53.5%

48%

47%

48%

48%

Labor

46.5%

52%

53%

52%

52%

NB. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2013 election.

Government decisions

Oct 7, 2014

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of the following decisions the Federal Government has made over the last 12 months?

 

Total approve

Total dis-approve

Net

 

Strongly approve

Approve

Dis-approve

Strongly dis-approve

No opinion

Turning back asylum seeker boats

61%

30%

+31

37%

24%

15%

15%

10%

Freezing foreign aid at current levels

58%

27%

+31

25%

33%

14%

13%

15%

Dumping the carbon tax

53%

34%

+19

24%

29%

14%

20%

12%

Sending military aid to Iraq

44%

43%

+1

12%

32%

20%

23%

13%

Dumping the mining tax

41%

42%

-1

15%

26%

19%

23%

18%

A six-month wait for under-30’s before they can receive unemployment benefits

38%

52%

-14

16%

22%

21%

31%

10%

Cutting public sector jobs

34%

52%

-18

10%

24%

28%

24%

14%

Cutting $120 million in future funding to the ABC

25%

58%

-33

11%

14%

28%

30%

17%

Increasing the pension age

28%

63%

-35

9%

19%

28%

35%

9%

$7 co-payment for visits to the doctor

27%

66%

-39

7%

20%

22%

44%

8%

Deregulating university fees

22%

63%

-41

6%

16%

23%

40%

14%

Cutting $20 billion from future hospital funding to the states

12%

81%

-69

4%

8%

27%

54%

8%

The most approved Government decisions were turning back asylum seeker boats (61% approve), freezing foreign aid (58%) and dumping the carbon tax (53%). The most disapproved decisions were cutting $20 billion from hospital funding (81% disapprove), $7 co-payment for doctor visits (66%), deregulating university fees (63%) and increasing the pension age (63%).

Sending military aid to Iraq was approved by men (51% approve/39% disapprove) but disapproved by women (37% approve/47% disapprove).

The $7 co-payment was disapproved by 72% of those aged 45-64 and 71% of those earning less than $1,000 pw.

Deregulating university fees was disapproved by 77% of those aged 18-24.

Management of the economy

Oct 7, 2014

Q. How would you rate the government’s management of the Australian economy compared to how governments in other countries around the world have managed their economies? 

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

May 2013

May 2014

Total Good

39%

21%

68%

25%

19%

39%

40%

Total Poor

28%

44%

7%

52%

38%

32%

31%

Very good

11%

5%

22%

4%

2%

11%

9%

Good

28%

16%

46%

21%

17%

28%

31%

Neither good nor poor

28%

31%

24%

18%

34%

24%

24%

Poor

15%

22%

6%

20%

20%

17%

14%

Very poor

13%

22%

1%

32%

18%

15%

17%

Don’t know

5%

3%

1%

4%

9%

5%

5%

39% of Australians would rate the government’s management of the economy, compared to other countries around the world, as good.

28% would rate their management of the economy as poor.

There have been no major shifts in attitudes since this question was asked in May.

Labor (21%), Greens (25%) and other (19%) voters were less likely to rate the government’s management of the economy as ‘good’. Lib/Nat voters (68%) were more likely to rate the government’s management of the economy as ‘good’.

47% of those earning $1,600+ pw rate the government’s management ‘good’ and 35% of those earning less than $1,000 pw rate it ‘poor’.

Concern about economic issues

Oct 7, 2014

Q. How concerned are you personally about the following economic issues? 

 

Very concerned

Somewhat concerned

Not so concerned

Not at all concerned

Don’t know

Cost of electricity and gas

57%

28%

12%

2%

2%

Cost of petrol

49%

33%

11%

4%

3%

Cost of food and groceries

45%

37%

13%

3%

2%

Housing affordability

40%

35%

18%

4%

3%

Job security

35%

34%

21%

8%

3%

Wealth disparity

33%

30%

22%

7%

9%

Unemployment

31%

41%

19%

6%

4%

Tax levels

28%

36%

25%

8%

4%

Interest rates

25%

31%

30%

11%

3%

Value of the Australian dollar

22%

31%

34%

8%

5%

The current budget deficit

21%

33%

29%

11%

6%

National debt

21%

33%

30%

11%

5%

Economic issues of most concern were cost of electricity/gas (57% very concerned), cost of petrol (49%), cost of food and groceries (45%) and housing affordability (40%).

68% of those aged 45+ were very concerned about the cost of electricity/gas.

Women were more concerned than men about cost of food and groceries (51% vs 39% very concerned), cost of electricity/gas (62% vs 52%) and cost of petrol (56% vs 43%).

Housing affordability

Oct 7, 2014

Q. Thinking about housing supply and affordability – which of the following would be the best way to make housing more affordable? And which would second? 

 

Best way to make housing affordable

Second best way to make housing affordable

Total

Make it easier for first home buyers to get a mortgage

20%

17%

37%

Increase the first home buyers grant

13%

15%

28%

Scrap negative gearing (which is a tax benefit to investors)

17%

10%

27%

Open up more land for development around the city fringes

11%

12%

23%

Build more medium density housing

9%

13%

22%

Build more public housing

11%

9%

20%

Build more high rise housing

2%

5%

7%

Don’t know

15%

6%

15%

The best ways to make housing more affordable were thought to be making it easier for first home buyers to get a mortgage (37%), increasing the first home buyers grant (28%) and scrapping negative gearing (27%).

Among those aged 18-35, 38% favoured making it easier to get a mortgage and 38% favoured increasing the first home buyers grant.

36% of those aged 55+ favoured scrapping negative gearing.

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